Tag: Komen

CHARITY FRAUD – SUSAN G, susan g komen donations.#Susan #g #komen #donations


CHARITY FRAUD – SUSAN G. KOMEN IS PURE CON

Mission Possible International

9270 River Club Parkway

Duluth, Georgia 30097

This is in response to the article, ” Where Does All The Komen For The Cure Money Really Go?” which may be found at: http://www.naturalnews.com/033783_Komen_for_the_Cure_pinkwashing.html

Many years ago in the early 1990’s I gave a talk in front of the State Capital on the Cure for Cancer. There were so many requests for it I made 4000 copies. Part of that speech is now in the book, “The Only Answer to Cancer” by Dr. Leonard Coldwell. You will see it under resources at the top of the page on http://www.mpwhi.com I wrote a chapter in the book. Michelle, a dear friend who was there and myself, went to the “Run For the Cure” to give out the speech, and information on aspartame, especially in original studies it caused so much mammary tumors. The people were so happy to get the free papers, especially since they could have called me for the formula I used to cure myself.

However, a woman from Susan Komen asked us to leave. If you knew Michelle you would know she is as feisty as they come, and says it as it is, and therefore very successful. Michelle said: “Do you really want to cure cancer or do you just want the money?” The lady in a very nasty tone said, “We just want the money so please leave.” Michelle told her in no uncertain terms that we were on public property and we weren’t leaving. If there was anything they didn’t want was someone to have the cure for cancer. The Sierra Club wrote about them many years ago and who was really behind Susan Komen.

Dr. Betty Martini, D.Hum.

Founder, Mission Possible World Health International

9270 River Club Parkway

Duluth, Georgia 30097

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The Susan G, susan g komen donations.#Susan #g #komen #donations


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Now you can donate directly to the

Orange County Affiliate of the

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.

Schedule and Information

OC Metro’s Cover Story:

Komen Orange County Affiliate

Susan G. Komen Foundation

2004 Community Profile

for Orange County

A summary of needs and gaps

in Orange County’s breast health services

(PDF format, 2 MB, 63 pages)

Susan g komen donations

Susan g komen donations

Sisters Nancy Suzy

Twenty-three years ago in Peoria, Illinois, Susan Goodman Komen, a beautiful mother of two, died of breast cancer at age 36. Before Susan died, her sister Nancy Goodman Brinker made a promise to Suzy that somehow she would make it better for other women diagnosed with the disease. In 1982, Nancy Brinker fulfilled her promise and established the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Read more about Suzy’s story.

Today, the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation is credited as the world’s leading catalyst in the fight against breast cancer with more than 75,000 volunteers working through 118 Komen Affiliates in communities nationwide, as well as three international Affiliates in Germany, Italy and Puerto Rico.

The Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) Public Charity as determined by the Internal Revenue Code, operating under the Charter of the organization, headquartered in Dallas, Texas. Since its inception in 1982 the Komen Foundation and its Affiliate network have raised more than $600 million for breast cancer research, education, screening and treatment. The Komen Orange County Affiliate has been making strides in our community since 1991. The Affiliate is proud to have raised more than $9 million on behalf of the Komen mission.


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Komen Foundation Struggles to Regain Wide Support, susan g komen donations.#Susan #g #komen #donations


The New York Times

Komen Foundation Works to Regain Support After Planned Parenthood Controversy

AS a phalanx of pink marched down Fifth Avenue in New York on a recent Sunday morning during Avon’s Walk for Breast Cancer, a group of women who call themselves the Social Sisters stood on the sidewalk, tooting on noisemakers and waving pompoms. “Way to go, ladies,” screamed Sarah Robertson, who completed the 39.3-mile walk last year.

But when asked if she would support another prominent nonprofit battling breast cancer, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Ms. Robertson’s cheery tone darkened. “I personally wouldn’t walk for Komen,” she said, citing the organization’s decision, disclosed in January, to eliminate $680,000 in grants to Planned Parenthood for breast cancer screenings and education programs.

Seen by many as a statement against legal abortion — Planned Parenthood is the nation’s largest abortion provider, though it also performs many other health services — the decision created a firestorm. Criticism of Komen dominated news coverage, and boycotts of the organization and some of its corporate sponsors spread through social media.

Komen quickly reversed course and restored the grants, but Ms. Robertson, who supports abortion rights, was not moved. “You only have so much time, effort and money to give,” she said.

On the other side of the abortion divide, the Atlanta archdiocese of the Catholic Church denounced a local Komen affiliate last month for its tenuous connection to Planned Parenthood. In an internal memo, the archdiocese said support for Komen Atlanta amounted to “direct cooperation with evil.” Komen Atlanta has not financed Planned Parenthood programs, but the archdiocese criticized it for having worked “behind the scenes” through Facebook to persuade Komen’s national organization to reinstate the grants.

The people at Komen, it seems, are pilloried no matter what they do.

Komen, the nation’s largest nonprofit devoted to preventing, treating and curing breast cancer, has moved to restore its battered brand. But several academics, crisis communications consultants and cause marketing experts said it needed to take more drastic action.

In a recent study by Harris Interactive, Komen’s “brand health” score fell 21 percent from last year. In the 23 years Harris has done the study, only Fannie Mae in 2009 had a bigger drop.

The damage to Komen transcends image problems. A spokeswoman said the organization’s signature Race for the Cure attracted 19 percent fewer participants through October than in the same period last year. Several Komen affiliates have reported that preliminary fund-raising figures from recent races were down from last year.

While the economy and more competition from similar events could depress fund-raising, many of these affiliates say they think the Planned Parenthood fallout contributed to the drop-off.

So far, corporate sponsors have stuck by the organization. General Mills significantly expanded its relationship with Komen this year, and World Wrestling Entertainment formed a new marketing alliance with the nonprofit.

But David Hessekiel, president of the Cause Marketing Forum and co-author of “Good Works: Marketing and Corporate Initiatives that Build a Better World . and the Bottom Line,” said he expected some sponsors to eventually, and discreetly, distance themselves from Komen. “A lot of people are spreading their bets by working with several breast cancer charities,” Mr. Hessekiel said. Some, he noted, “probably have multiyear contracts. It’s not so easy on a dime to extricate yourself.”

Gene Grabowski, executive vice president of Levick Strategic Communications in Washington, criticized Komen for letting its mission become entangled with politics and offending “both sides of the political spectrum.”

Mr. Grabowski, who specializes in crisis management, estimated that depoliticizing the brand could take as long as four years. “If it had been a run-of-the-mill scandal, something that was not involving politics, where you can remove one executive or human fallibility is easily grasped, then you can get out of situations a little bit easier,” he said.

Komen seizes every chance to remind critics of its good deeds. “What we are focused on now is mission,” said Andrea Rader, its managing director of communications. “There are people who are still interested in talking about the controversy. They will do that. All we can do is demonstrate that what we do is important, it matters, it saves lives, it gets us closer to cure.”

Ms. Rader described a multipronged effort to refocus attention on Komen’s accomplishments.

For National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, she said, Komen started a blog, 31 Days of Impact, with daily testimonials from breast cancer survivors, advocates and researchers.

The organization has also begun a print and television advertising campaign, “I Am Susan G. Komen,” to show how it helped four breast cancer survivors. In one TV spot, Alantheia Peña, a Bronx resident who received financial assistance from Komen, recounts tearfully of learning of her diagnosis when both of her daughters were pregnant. “Everything I was looking forward to turned into everything I was going to miss: first words, first steps, being there for my grandchildren,” she says.

Daniel Diermeier, a professor at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and author of “Reputation Rules: Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset,” praised Komen’s ads. “The organization or the brand is damaged, and then what you do is try to connect it with personal stories to reinvigorate,” Mr. Diermeier said. “Remind people that you are saving lives.”

Some executives associated with the Planned Parenthood imbroglio have left Komen. Karen C. Handel, who was the group’s senior vice president for public policy and advocated cutting financing to Planned Parenthood, resigned in February. Before joining Komen, Ms. Handel had expressed her opposition to abortion and Planned Parenthood in an unsuccessful run to become the Republican nominee for governor of Georgia.

Ms. Handel, author of “Planned Bullyhood: The Truth About the Planned Parenthood Funding Battle With Susan G. Komen for the Cure,” said Komen was paying a price for alienating anti-abortion supporters. “I could not work for an organization that gave in to political pressure and put political pressure and the threats from Planned Parenthood and their allies over the mission of the organization,” she said in a telephone interview.

Ms. Rader responded: “These are Karen’s personal views. In reversing the decision, we acted in the best interests of the women we serve and the organization’s mission.”

A former executive and a current adviser said Komen’s postcontroversy strategy involved lowering the profile of its chief executive, Nancy G. Brinker, who founded the organization in 1982 to honor her sister, who died of breast cancer. Ms. Brinker signed off last November on cutting Planned Parenthood’s grants, and an interview she gave Andrea Mitchell of MSNBC to justify the decision was widely criticized.

“The strategy has been to keep Nancy under wraps a bit — have her stop being a lightning rod,” said a former Komen executive, who was not authorized to speak for the organization and requested anonymity.

Ms. Rader denied that Komen was silencing Ms. Brinker. “Nancy has been active this year,” she said. “She has given speeches. She appeared at the U.N. General Assembly. Nobody is hiding Nancy.” She said Ms. Brinker would not be made available for an interview.

In August, Ms. Brinker announced that she would step down as chief executive to become chairwoman of the Komen Board Executive Committee, focusing on fund-raising and on expanding Komen’s international presence.

Denise Sevick Bortree, an assistant professor at Pennsylvania State University’s College of Communications who studies nonprofits, said she doubted that Ms. Brinker’s new job would mollify angry donors. “She’s gone, but she’s not really gone,” Ms. Sevick Bortree said. “Getting rid of the people, the board who had been involved in the decision, would have been a way to acknowledge that this was a mistake.”

But cleaning house can be costly, Ms. Sevick Bortree said, because “removing board members eliminates huge sources of funding for the organization.”

Mr. Grabowski, the crisis communications consultant, said Ms. Brinker should resign “for the good of the cause.” He cited the recent departure of Lance Armstrong, the former professional bicycle racer who is mired in a doping scandal, from Livestrong, the cancer charity Mr. Armstrong started. “Lance leaves and Livestrong moves forward,” Mr. Grabowski said.

Even if Ms. Brinker remains at Komen, Mr. Grabowski said, there are remedial measures the organization can take to regain its footing. For instance, he said, Komen could follow the example of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International, which uses the actress Mary Tyler Moore as its main representative.

“You need a new face,” Mr. Grabowski said. “Under these circumstances, it would be helpful to have an icon, someone who can give them cover.”


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CHARITY FRAUD – SUSAN G, susan g komen donations.#Susan #g #komen #donations


CHARITY FRAUD – SUSAN G. KOMEN IS PURE CON

Mission Possible International

9270 River Club Parkway

Duluth, Georgia 30097

This is in response to the article, ” Where Does All The Komen For The Cure Money Really Go?” which may be found at: http://www.naturalnews.com/033783_Komen_for_the_Cure_pinkwashing.html

Many years ago in the early 1990’s I gave a talk in front of the State Capital on the Cure for Cancer. There were so many requests for it I made 4000 copies. Part of that speech is now in the book, “The Only Answer to Cancer” by Dr. Leonard Coldwell. You will see it under resources at the top of the page on http://www.mpwhi.com I wrote a chapter in the book. Michelle, a dear friend who was there and myself, went to the “Run For the Cure” to give out the speech, and information on aspartame, especially in original studies it caused so much mammary tumors. The people were so happy to get the free papers, especially since they could have called me for the formula I used to cure myself.

However, a woman from Susan Komen asked us to leave. If you knew Michelle you would know she is as feisty as they come, and says it as it is, and therefore very successful. Michelle said: “Do you really want to cure cancer or do you just want the money?” The lady in a very nasty tone said, “We just want the money so please leave.” Michelle told her in no uncertain terms that we were on public property and we weren’t leaving. If there was anything they didn’t want was someone to have the cure for cancer. The Sierra Club wrote about them many years ago and who was really behind Susan Komen.

Dr. Betty Martini, D.Hum.

Founder, Mission Possible World Health International

9270 River Club Parkway

Duluth, Georgia 30097

Susan g komen donations Susan g komen donations Susan g komen donations


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The Susan G, susan g komen donations.#Susan #g #komen #donations


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To eradicate breast cancer as a life-threatening disease by advancing research, education, screening, and treatment.

Susan g komen donations

Seventy-five percent of net proceeds stay in Orange County for local breast cancer outreach, education,

screening and treatment programs. Twenty-five percent of net proceeds directly support the Komen Foundation s Research Program. The Komen Foundation is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization. The Foundation’s Tax I.D. number is 33-0487943.

You may place your donation on a Visa, MasterCard or American Express credit card by calling (714) 957-9157.

Mail donations to:

The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation

3191-A Airport Loop Drive

Costa Mesa, CA 92626

City:________________ State:______ Zip:_________

Home Phone:________________________ Work Phone:_____________________ Fax:_____________________

I am a cancer survivor? Yes__ No___ Type of Cancer?________________

Please accept my tax-deductible donation of $ ________.

I would like this donation to be in honor of _________________________________ or memory of _________________________________.

Please send an acknowledgement of my in honor/memory of gift to:

City:________________ State:______ Zip:_________

Komen Foundation Wish List

In-kind donations of products and services help keep our expenses low, so more dollars go to fight breast cancer. We especially need:

Top Priority Items:

  • 2 LCD projectors with collapsible screens for education and outreach presentations
  • Receptionist to help answer phones year-round (office hours are Monday – Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m
  • Copying and printing services
  • Offsite storage space, a ground-level unit that a truck can be backed into
  • Postage and shipping
  • Pledge Prizes for the Race for the Cure
  • Video Camera

Other Komen Foundation needs:

  • 100 copies of Chicken Soup for the Volunteer’s Soul for use as thank you gifts
  • Fountain for our courtyard
  • Office supplies, including copy paper, floppy discs, ink cartridges, toner, CD-RW discs, etc.
  • Clocks for our meeting rooms and offices
  • New computers: 5 Brand New Computers with CD-ROMs and CD-RW. Would prefer Dell, HP, or Gateway computers with sound cards and speakers.
  • Computer training on Excel, Power Point and Word

Wishes do come true

Thank you to all who generously provided.

  • Isabel Reed – 3 wall clocks and batteries
  • John Ross – binders
  • Click Consulting – as part of their sponsorship have donated computer training to staff
  • Experian – storage space

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Fact Check: Susan G, susan g komen donations.#Susan #g #komen #donations


Fact Check: Susan G. Komen giving as much as they should?

Times-Union readers want to know:

Is it true that Susan G. Komen, the huge breast cancer organization gives only 20 percent of its donations to cancer research and pays its CEO $684,000 per year?

These elements are true, but deserve some explanation.

After Susan Komen, 33, died of breast cancer in 1980, her younger sister, Nancy Brinker, promised she would put all her energy into ending the disease. In 1982, Brinker — who later became a breast cancer survivor — founded The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, later known as Susan G. Komen for the Cure, then Susan G. Komen.

In early 2012, Komen created a firestorm when it announced it was pulling its grants, about $680,000, for Planned Parenthood’s breast cancer screenings. Both Komen supporters and abortion rights advocates slammed the decision. Media reports put Karen Handel, executive vice president of public policy for Komen, at the center of the controversy. The reports said that during a failed gubernatorial bid in Georgia, Handel had made clear her intent to defund Planned Parenthood if elected and had continued to pursue that goal at Komen.

After a few days and much public criticism, Komen reversed the decision to defund Planned Parenthood. Handel resigned; then, in August 2012, Brinker announced that she would be stepping down.

But controversy erupted again when in 2013 Brinker was still the CEO and received a 64 percent raise to up her salary to $684,000 a year, according to the charity’s tax filing.

Komen said that Brinker had stated that she would resign as soon as a replacement was found; it was announced in the summer of 2013 that the replacement would be Judith A. Salerno, the former executive director and chief operating officer of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Kormen also said that raise came in November 2010, before the controversy, Snopes.com reported.

Ken Berger, president and CEO of Charity Navigator, which evaluates and rates charities, called Brinker’s salary “extremely high,” Snopes.com reported.

“This pay package is way outside the norm. It’s about a quarter of a million dollars more than what we see for charities of this size. This is more than the head of the Red Cross is making, for an organization that is one-tenth the size of the Red Cross.”

Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern makes $561,000, according to the most recent financial documents.

Charity Navigator’s most recent compensation figure for Nancy Brinker — who is chairwoman of Komen’s global strategy — is $560,896 per year, while the Komen president, Elizabeth Thompson, is listed as making $606,461.

As of now, the Charity Navigator does not include Salerno, Komen’s current CEO, in its salary database. The Dallas Morning News did report that Salerno, who earned about $270,000 at her current job, will earn less than Brinker did in the Komen CEO position. A spokesman would not specify the amount, the newspaper reported.

The reference to Komen’s applying only 20 percent of donated money to breast cancer research probably comes from a pie chart in the “Use of Funds” section of Wikipedia’s article about Susan G. Komen for the Cure, which shows Komen’s 2009-2010 expenses, Snopes.com reports:

That graph shows that research takes 20.9 percent, while public health education takes 39.1 percent, health screening services takes 13 percent, 5.6 percent for treatment, 10 percent for fundraising and 11.3 percent for administrative costs.

But Snopes.com notes that organizations such as Komen, the Muscular Dystrophy Association and the like don’t only exist for research, but also for educational and outreach programs, screening and diagnostic procedures and arranging treatment and home care for patients with those diseases.

Snopes.com said that a more relevant assessment would be the percentage of the organization’s budget that is actually spent on the programs and services the charity delivers. In this area, Charity Navigator gives Komen an 82.9 percent rating.

Charity Navigator gives Komen an overall rating of 81.96 percent (3 of 4 stars); 74.67 (2 stars) for financials; and 97 percent in accountability and transparency (4 stars).

Also, when it relates to high salaries, Charity Navigator says that the typical charity CEO’s annual compensation is in the low- to mid-six figures, mainly because the charities have multimillion dollar budgets, hundreds of employees and thousands of constituents to organize and run. And, the charity evaluator said, these leaders could inevitably make much more running similarly sized for-profit firms.

Whether you agree with Charity Navigator’s assessments, or whether you can understand the six-figure salaries to the Komen execs and the 21 percent research funding, you’re the one with the power: It’s your decision to donate or not.


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Komen Foundation Struggles to Regain Wide Support, susan g komen donations.#Susan #g #komen #donations


The New York Times

Komen Foundation Works to Regain Support After Planned Parenthood Controversy

AS a phalanx of pink marched down Fifth Avenue in New York on a recent Sunday morning during Avon’s Walk for Breast Cancer, a group of women who call themselves the Social Sisters stood on the sidewalk, tooting on noisemakers and waving pompoms. “Way to go, ladies,” screamed Sarah Robertson, who completed the 39.3-mile walk last year.

But when asked if she would support another prominent nonprofit battling breast cancer, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Ms. Robertson’s cheery tone darkened. “I personally wouldn’t walk for Komen,” she said, citing the organization’s decision, disclosed in January, to eliminate $680,000 in grants to Planned Parenthood for breast cancer screenings and education programs.

Seen by many as a statement against legal abortion — Planned Parenthood is the nation’s largest abortion provider, though it also performs many other health services — the decision created a firestorm. Criticism of Komen dominated news coverage, and boycotts of the organization and some of its corporate sponsors spread through social media.

Komen quickly reversed course and restored the grants, but Ms. Robertson, who supports abortion rights, was not moved. “You only have so much time, effort and money to give,” she said.

On the other side of the abortion divide, the Atlanta archdiocese of the Catholic Church denounced a local Komen affiliate last month for its tenuous connection to Planned Parenthood. In an internal memo, the archdiocese said support for Komen Atlanta amounted to “direct cooperation with evil.” Komen Atlanta has not financed Planned Parenthood programs, but the archdiocese criticized it for having worked “behind the scenes” through Facebook to persuade Komen’s national organization to reinstate the grants.

The people at Komen, it seems, are pilloried no matter what they do.

Komen, the nation’s largest nonprofit devoted to preventing, treating and curing breast cancer, has moved to restore its battered brand. But several academics, crisis communications consultants and cause marketing experts said it needed to take more drastic action.

In a recent study by Harris Interactive, Komen’s “brand health” score fell 21 percent from last year. In the 23 years Harris has done the study, only Fannie Mae in 2009 had a bigger drop.

The damage to Komen transcends image problems. A spokeswoman said the organization’s signature Race for the Cure attracted 19 percent fewer participants through October than in the same period last year. Several Komen affiliates have reported that preliminary fund-raising figures from recent races were down from last year.

While the economy and more competition from similar events could depress fund-raising, many of these affiliates say they think the Planned Parenthood fallout contributed to the drop-off.

So far, corporate sponsors have stuck by the organization. General Mills significantly expanded its relationship with Komen this year, and World Wrestling Entertainment formed a new marketing alliance with the nonprofit.

But David Hessekiel, president of the Cause Marketing Forum and co-author of “Good Works: Marketing and Corporate Initiatives that Build a Better World . and the Bottom Line,” said he expected some sponsors to eventually, and discreetly, distance themselves from Komen. “A lot of people are spreading their bets by working with several breast cancer charities,” Mr. Hessekiel said. Some, he noted, “probably have multiyear contracts. It’s not so easy on a dime to extricate yourself.”

Gene Grabowski, executive vice president of Levick Strategic Communications in Washington, criticized Komen for letting its mission become entangled with politics and offending “both sides of the political spectrum.”

Mr. Grabowski, who specializes in crisis management, estimated that depoliticizing the brand could take as long as four years. “If it had been a run-of-the-mill scandal, something that was not involving politics, where you can remove one executive or human fallibility is easily grasped, then you can get out of situations a little bit easier,” he said.

Komen seizes every chance to remind critics of its good deeds. “What we are focused on now is mission,” said Andrea Rader, its managing director of communications. “There are people who are still interested in talking about the controversy. They will do that. All we can do is demonstrate that what we do is important, it matters, it saves lives, it gets us closer to cure.”

Ms. Rader described a multipronged effort to refocus attention on Komen’s accomplishments.

For National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, she said, Komen started a blog, 31 Days of Impact, with daily testimonials from breast cancer survivors, advocates and researchers.

The organization has also begun a print and television advertising campaign, “I Am Susan G. Komen,” to show how it helped four breast cancer survivors. In one TV spot, Alantheia Peña, a Bronx resident who received financial assistance from Komen, recounts tearfully of learning of her diagnosis when both of her daughters were pregnant. “Everything I was looking forward to turned into everything I was going to miss: first words, first steps, being there for my grandchildren,” she says.

Daniel Diermeier, a professor at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and author of “Reputation Rules: Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset,” praised Komen’s ads. “The organization or the brand is damaged, and then what you do is try to connect it with personal stories to reinvigorate,” Mr. Diermeier said. “Remind people that you are saving lives.”

Some executives associated with the Planned Parenthood imbroglio have left Komen. Karen C. Handel, who was the group’s senior vice president for public policy and advocated cutting financing to Planned Parenthood, resigned in February. Before joining Komen, Ms. Handel had expressed her opposition to abortion and Planned Parenthood in an unsuccessful run to become the Republican nominee for governor of Georgia.

Ms. Handel, author of “Planned Bullyhood: The Truth About the Planned Parenthood Funding Battle With Susan G. Komen for the Cure,” said Komen was paying a price for alienating anti-abortion supporters. “I could not work for an organization that gave in to political pressure and put political pressure and the threats from Planned Parenthood and their allies over the mission of the organization,” she said in a telephone interview.

Ms. Rader responded: “These are Karen’s personal views. In reversing the decision, we acted in the best interests of the women we serve and the organization’s mission.”

A former executive and a current adviser said Komen’s postcontroversy strategy involved lowering the profile of its chief executive, Nancy G. Brinker, who founded the organization in 1982 to honor her sister, who died of breast cancer. Ms. Brinker signed off last November on cutting Planned Parenthood’s grants, and an interview she gave Andrea Mitchell of MSNBC to justify the decision was widely criticized.

“The strategy has been to keep Nancy under wraps a bit — have her stop being a lightning rod,” said a former Komen executive, who was not authorized to speak for the organization and requested anonymity.

Ms. Rader denied that Komen was silencing Ms. Brinker. “Nancy has been active this year,” she said. “She has given speeches. She appeared at the U.N. General Assembly. Nobody is hiding Nancy.” She said Ms. Brinker would not be made available for an interview.

In August, Ms. Brinker announced that she would step down as chief executive to become chairwoman of the Komen Board Executive Committee, focusing on fund-raising and on expanding Komen’s international presence.

Denise Sevick Bortree, an assistant professor at Pennsylvania State University’s College of Communications who studies nonprofits, said she doubted that Ms. Brinker’s new job would mollify angry donors. “She’s gone, but she’s not really gone,” Ms. Sevick Bortree said. “Getting rid of the people, the board who had been involved in the decision, would have been a way to acknowledge that this was a mistake.”

But cleaning house can be costly, Ms. Sevick Bortree said, because “removing board members eliminates huge sources of funding for the organization.”

Mr. Grabowski, the crisis communications consultant, said Ms. Brinker should resign “for the good of the cause.” He cited the recent departure of Lance Armstrong, the former professional bicycle racer who is mired in a doping scandal, from Livestrong, the cancer charity Mr. Armstrong started. “Lance leaves and Livestrong moves forward,” Mr. Grabowski said.

Even if Ms. Brinker remains at Komen, Mr. Grabowski said, there are remedial measures the organization can take to regain its footing. For instance, he said, Komen could follow the example of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International, which uses the actress Mary Tyler Moore as its main representative.

“You need a new face,” Mr. Grabowski said. “Under these circumstances, it would be helpful to have an icon, someone who can give them cover.”


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Charitable Giving, Susan G, susan g komen donations.#Susan #g #komen #donations


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Supporting Susan G. Komen through a planned gift not only strengthens the hard work we do in our communities by funding research, but it also has a lasting impact on future generations to come. There are many options of charitable gifts and we invite you to join us in the fight against breast cancer, and consider one that works well for your needs. We look forward to your partnership.

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Susan g komen donations

Susan g komen donations

A charitable bequest is one or two sentences in your will or living trust that leave to Susan G. Komen a specific item, an amount of money, a gift contingent upon certain events or a percentage of your estate.

an individual or organization designated to receive benefits or funds under a will or other contract, such as an insurance policy, trust or retirement plan

“I give to Susan G. Komen, a nonprofit corporation currently located at 5005 LBJ Freeway, Suite 526 Dallas, TX 75244, or its successor thereto, ______________* [written amount or percentage of the estate or description of property] for its unrestricted use and purpose.”

able to be changed or cancelled

A revocable living trust is set up during your lifetime and can be revoked at any time before death. They allow assets held in the trust to pass directly to beneficiaries without probate court proceedings and can also reduce federal estate taxes.

cannot be changed or cancelled

tax on gifts generally paid by the person making the gift rather than the recipient

the original value of an asset, such as stock, before its appreciation or depreciation

the growth in value of an asset like stock or real estate since the original purchase

the price a willing buyer and willing seller can agree on

The person receiving the gift annuity payments.

the part of an estate left after debts, taxes and specific bequests have been paid

a written and properly witnessed legal change to a will

the person named in a will to manage the estate, collect the property, pay any debt, and distribute property according to the will

A donor advised fund is an account that you set up but which is managed by a nonprofit organization. You contribute to the account, which grows tax-free. You can recommend how much (and how often) you want to distribute money from that fund to Komen or other charities. You cannot direct the gifts.

An endowed gift can create a new endowment or add to an existing endowment. The principal of the endowment is invested and a portion of the principal s earnings are used each year to support our mission.

Tax on the growth in value of an asset such as real estate or stock since its original purchase.

Securities, real estate, or any other property having a fair market value greater than its original purchase price.

Real estate can be a personal residence, vacation home, timeshare property, farm, commercial property or undeveloped land.

A charitable remainder trust provides you or other named individuals income each year for life or a period not exceeding 20 years from assets you give to the trust you create.

You give assets to a trust that pays our organization set payments for a number of years, which you choose. The longer the length of time, the better the gift tax savings to you. When the term is up, the remaining trust assets go to you, your family or other beneficiaries you select. This is an excellent way to transfer property to family members at a minimal cost.

You fund this type of trust with cash or appreciated assets and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. You can also make additional gifts; each one also qualifies for a tax deduction. The trust pays you, each year, a variable amount based on a fixed percentage of the fair market value of the trust assets. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Komen as a lump sum.

You fund this trust with cash or appreciated assets and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. Each year the trust pays you or another named individual the same dollar amount you choose at the start. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Komen as a lump sum.

A beneficiary designation clearly identifies how specific assets will be distributed after your death.

A charitable gift annuity involves a simple contract between you and Komen where you agree to make a gift to Komen and we, in return, agree to pay you (and someone else, if you choose) a fixed amount each year for the rest of your life.


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Susan G Komen® Central Indiana #donate #animals


#susan g komen donations

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It’s simple. Komen Central Indiana is fighting breast cancer. How?

  • Beginning close to home, we use donated dollars wisely, locally and in ways that directly benefit women, men and families who are dealing with the costly challenge of breast cancer in our community. We also empower local dollars to serve beyond our community as they fund a significant portion of the best breast cancer research around the world.

Komen Central Indiana is the local source for funding programs that provide breast health services, breast cancer education and outreach in central Indiana.

Through generous gifts of time, money and personal commitment, Komen Central Indiana helps local women today with early detection of breast cancer and the navigation of treatment. We help women tomorrow by funding research that makes early detection easier, care better and outcomes more successful.

Since 1997 Komen Central Indiana has awarded over $20 million in community grants to local organizations that deliver breast health services in our 41-county service area.

The Difference We Make

Komen Central Indiana is part of the big picture to eradicate breast cancer. But we’re also focused on the local needs of our neighbors. Donations to Komen Central Indiana save lives of women we all know and love within the place we call home. Beyond our community, donations fund groundbreaking research that will improve the way breast cancers are treated in the future. Komen ignites the inner strength of individual women, men and families. We rally resources in central Indiana to meet the needs of Hoosiers dealing with breast cancer.

The Difference You Make

It may be a mom, a sister or wife. A friend, neighbor or long-time coworker. Breast cancer affects so many people, chances are it’s impacted someone close. Join Komen Central Indiana in supporting our local communities and finding the cures. You can donate your time or resources or host a fundraiser in our 21-county service area. Or, be an inspiration and share your story as a survivor! Contact us today . We’re here to partner with you.

We’re only a click or a call away. However you reach us, we are always happy to help you.


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Susan G Komen® Arizona #how #to #start #a #donation #fund


#susan g komen donations

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Komen Promise: to save lives and end breast cancer forever by empowering people, ensuring quality of care for all and energizing science to find the cures.

  • Funding programs that support those in the fight to save lives
  • Educating individuals about breast cancer risk factors . the importance of early detection and the resources that are available to them

While perhaps best known for Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure® – our affiliate is engaged in year-round activities that help us fulfill the Komen Promise on a daily basis:

• advocating for universal access to screening and treatment
• providing breast health education and community outreach
• serving as a resource for survivors and co-survivors
• funding life-saving education, screening and treatment programs in Arizona

Komen Arizona has been raising funds and supporting Arizona communities for 23 years, generating more than $35.6 million in donations. To date, more than $26.6 million has been allocated to local education, screening and treatment programs and more than $9 million has been raised for international breast cancer research.

The Difference We Make

Komen Arizona is part of the big picture to eradicate breast cancer. But we’re also focused on the local needs of our neighbors. We are dedicated to educating the residents in our service area about breast cancer and the resources available along with funding life-saving screening and treatment programs in for our neighbors currently battling this disease.

Since 1993, Komen Arizona’s funding provided the following thru our community grants program:
• 49,840 free or reduced cost mammograms
• 8,403 diagnostic treatments
• 7,012 breast cancer treatments
• Hundreds of thousands of individuals with education

The Difference You Make

Join Komen Arizona in the fight to beat breast cancer. You can donate your time or resources, fundraise for Komen Arizona . or speak about this disease across Arizona. You can know your normal and encourage those around you to know theirs. You can be a listening ear and strong shoulder to family and friends who are in the battle. And you can be an inspiration and tell your story as a survivor. There is a place for you in this fight. Your dollar might be the one that ultimately finds one of the cures. Your presentation might encourage a listener to get a mammogram and find her cancer at an earlier stage. Contact us today. We’re here to partner with you.

We’re only a click or a call away. However you reach us, we are always happy to help you.


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