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Global Health Ethics Student Curriculum #blood #donation #pictures


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Global Health Ethics Student Curriculum

In recent years, increasing numbers of US-based health professions students have traveled to low resource settings to conduct short-term research projects and participate in clinical electives. The content of pre-departure training can be highly variable, leaving students unprepared for the ethical challenges posed by these experiences. This is magnified by the lack of attention paid to the burdens and benefits for local staff, institutions, and patient well-being in the setting of disproportionate poverty and disease. This curriculum explores some of the ethical challenges posed by US-based students’ global experiences through a series of case studies based on the experiences of the students. The curriculum includes pre-departure training and post-return debriefing sessions, which may be implemented in 1.5 hours each in groups of up to 20 students. The sessions are designed to be facilitated by student leaders with faculty guidance.

Introduction to Global Research Ethics

Recently, interest in global health among US-based medical students has exploded, and increasing numbers of students are traveling to low-resource settings for clinical and research electives.1,2 One study showed that trainees who have such experiences are more likely to care for impoverished patients in the future and that some may have even changed the focus of their clinical training from sub-specialty medicine to general medicine as a result of their time abroad.3 Another study documented an increased interest in volunteerism, humanitarianism, and public health among students who participated in an international elective; however, more research is necessary to truly understand the effects of international experiences on medical trainees.4 Furthermore, although there is some evidence that these experiences positively contribute to the professional development of medical students, there is no evidence that the patients involved in research by these trainees derive any benefit from these programs. Sending students to developing countries for short-term research experiences brings additional layers of complexity to an already ethically fraught situation.

In this curriculum, we explore some ethical concerns that are raised by medical students traveling to low-resource settings for short-term research projects.

Curriculum Components

1. Pre-Departure Workshop

2. Post-Return Workshop

Introduction, Cases and Discussions adapted from Provenzano AM, Graber LK, Elansary M, Khoshnood K, Rastegar A, Barry M. Short-term global health research projects by US medical students: Ethical challenges for partnerships. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2010;83:211-4

Research Ethics Curriculum Team References in Sidebar

Introduction to Global Health Clinical Ethics

A recent Association of American Medical Colleges survey found that 30% of graduates of U.S. medical schools reported participating in global health experiences.1 Previous research has shown that international rotations foster cultural awareness, elicit a deeper understanding of poverty, and influence students to pursue careers caring for underserved populations.2-5 Despite considerable interest in global health education from students and its reported benefits, however, most schools have not integrated formal global health programs into their curricula.6,7 Only recently have formal ethical guidelines for global health experiences been proposed.8,9 The lack of an institutionalized framework for global health education has had important ethical and educational implications for medical students who pursue electives in resource-poor settings.

International research programs are governed by well-developed clinical guidelines, but global clinical electives carry with them many ethical challenges that have received relatively little attention.10 While international research programs contribute to the larger academic discourse and are subject to institutional review board approval and other ethical standards, clinical programs that involve students also impact the local community and thus require similar attention. In particular, the perspectives and needs of institutions that host and support foreign students at the international clinical sites in low-resource settings (“host institutions”) have been neglected. Electives have been described as a “one-way opportunity” that favor students who visit from wealthier institutions.11 Paradoxically, the disproportionate focus on the benefits for visiting students rather than for the host institution reinforces the same disparities in wealth and opportunity that global health programs seek to address.

The case studies presented here, based on the experiences of the students, provide a tool for pre-departure training of medical students preparing for international electives.

Curriculum Components

1. Pre-Departure Workshop

2. Post-Return Workshop

Introduction, Cases, and Discussions adapted from Elansary M, Graber LK, Provenzano AM, Barry M, Khoshnood K, Rastegar A. Ethical dilemmas in global clinical electives. The Journal of Global Health. 2011;1(1): 24-27

Research Ethics Curriculum

Research Ethics Curriculum Team

1. Drain PK, Holmes KK, Skeff KM, Hall TL, Gardner P. Global health training and international clinical rotations during residency: current status, needs, and opportunities. Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges 2009;84:320-5.
2. Panosian C, Coates TJ. The new medical missionaries grooming the next generation of global health workers. The New England Journal of Medicine 2006;354:1771-3.
3. Gupta AR, Wells CK, Horwitz RI, Bia FJ, Barry M. The International Health Program: the fifteen-year experience with Yale University s Internal Medicine Residency Program. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 1999;61:1019-23.
4. Smith JK, Weaver DB. Capturing medical students idealism. Annals of Family Medicine 2006;4 Suppl 1:S32-7; discussion S58-60.

Clinical Ethics Curriculum

Clinical Ethics Curriculum Team

1. Association of American Medical C. 2010 Medical School Graduation Questionnaire: All Schools Summary Report. Washington, DC: Association of American Medical Colleges; 2010.
2. McKinley DW, Williams SR, Norcini JJ, Anderson MB. International exchange programs and U.S. medical schools. Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges 2008;83:S53-7.
3. Ramsey AH, Haq C, Gjerde CL, Rothenberg D. Career influence of an international health experience during medical school. Family Medicine 2004;36:412-6.
4. Shaywitz DA, Ausiello DA. Global health: a chance for Western physicians to give-and receive. The American Journal of Medicine 2002;113:354-7.
5. Gupta AR, Wells CK, Horwitz RI, Bia FJ, Barry M. The International Health Program: the fifteen-year experience with Yale University s Internal Medicine Residency Program. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 1999;61:1019-23.
6. Izadnegahdar R, Correia S, Ohata B, et al. Global health in Canadian medical education: current practices and opportunities. Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges 2008;83:192-8.
7. Panosian C, Coates TJ. The new medical missionaries grooming the next generation of global health workers. The New England Journal of Medicine 2006;354:1771-3.
8. Crump JA, Sugarman J, Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health T. Ethics and best practice guidelines for training experiences in global health. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2010;83:1178-82.
9. Provenzano AM, Graber LK, Elansary M, Khoshnood K, Rastegar A, Barry M. Short-term global health research projects by US medical students: ethical challenges for partnerships. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2010;83:211-4.
10. Shah S, Wu T. The medical student global health experience: professionalism and ethical implications. Journal of Medical Ethics 2008;34:375-8.
11. Mutchnick IS, Moyer CA, Stern DT. Expanding the boundaries of medical education: evidence for cross-cultural exchanges. Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges 2003;78:S1-5.


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Why Donating Blood Is Good For Your Health #raise #money #online


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Why Donating Blood Is Good For Your Health

It’s time to roll up your sleeve and save a life — including yours.

Every two seconds, someone in the United States needs blood, with a total of 44,000 blood donations needed every day, reports the American Red Cross. One whole blood donation. which takes approximately 45 minutes to an hour, can come to the rescue of as many as three patients.

Harold Mendenhall, an 84-year-old lifetime blood donor from South Florida, donated his 100th gallon of blood, The Palm Beach Post reported. He started giving blood on July 7, 1977 when his wife, Frankie, was diagnosed with breast cancer. After she died, going to the blood bank was a way Mendenhall could deal with the grief of losing his wife and later his two sons. At least, he could save those who needed a blood transfusion.

Mendenhall, strong and healthy, donates 6 gallons of blood a year by platelets. In a platelet donation, a machine withdrawals the blood, filters out the platelets, and returns the rest of the blood to the donor, according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. This donation procedure takes 70 to 90 minutes and can be done once every seven days, allowing for the donor to give blood every few weeks instead of the eight weeks of waiting required for a non-platelet donation. Whole blood donors can also donate platelets 72 hours after a whole blood donation, and vice versa.

Blood donors must be 17 years old in most states, with some states lowering the limit to 16 years old with parental consent. Donors ages 16 to 18 are also subject to additional height and weight restrictions, says the New York Blood Center. A single individual who donates whole blood starting at 17 years old every 56 days until they reach 76 will have donated 48 gallons of blood, potentially saving more than 1,000 lives, says the American Red Cross.

While the health benefits of recipients who receive blood transfusions are clear, altruistic blood donors too, can reap the benefits.

Preserves Cardiovascular Health

Blood viscosity is known to be a unifying factor for the risk of cardiovascular disease, says the Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide. How thick and sticky your blood is and how much friction your blood creates through the blood vessels can determine how much damage is done to the cells lining your arteries. You can reduce your blood viscosity by donating blood on a regular basis, which eliminates the iron that may possibly oxidize in your blood. An increase in oxidative stress can be damaging to your cardiovascular system.

Blood donation reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes, too. In a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers found that participants ages 43 to 61 had fewer heart attacks and strokes when they donated blood every six months. In a study published by the American Journal of Epidemiology. researchers found in a sample size of 2,682 men in Finland, those who donated blood a minimum of once a year had an 88 percent lower risk of heart attacks than those who did not donate.

The removal of oxidative iron from the body through blood donations means less iron oxidation and reduced cardiovascular diseases.

Reduces The Risk of Cancer

The reduction of iron stores and iron in the body while giving blood can reduce the risk of cancer. Iron has been thought of to increase free-radical damage in the body and has been linked to an increased risk of cancer and aging, says a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Researchers followed 1,200 people split into groups of two over the course of 4 ½ years. One group reduced their iron stores by blood donations twice a year, whereas the other group did not make any changes. The results of the study showed that the group of blood donors had lower iron levels, and a lower risk of cancer and mortality.

The Miller-Keystone Blood Center says that the consistency of blood donations is associated with lower risks of cancers including liver, lung, colon, and throat cancers due to the reduction in oxidative stress when iron is released from the bloodstream.

Burns Calories

People burn approximately 650 calories per donation of one pint of blood, according to the University of California, San Diego. A donor who regularly donates blood can lose a significant amount of weight, but it should not be thought of as a weight loss plan by any means. To donate blood the American Red Cross requires donors to weigh at least 110 pounds and maintain healthy iron levels in the body.

Provides A Free Blood Analysis

Upon donation, donors are tested for syphilis, HIV, hepatitis, and other diseases. Testing indicates whether or not you are eligible to donate based on what is found in your bloodstream, says the American Red Cross. The organization also notes that a sample of your blood may be used now or in the future for additional tests and other medical research with your consent.


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Health Benefits and Side Effects of Blood Donation #blood #donation #information


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Blood Donation

Health Benefits and Side Effects of Blood Donation

Blood donation does not have any major side effects, but there are several benefits. Blood donation improves heart health, reduces cancer risk and burns calories.

Improves Cardiovascular Health – Studies have shown that an increased level of iron in the blood raises the chance of heart disease. Regular blood donation helps males in particular to reduce the amount of iron in the blood which can reduce the chance of heart attack by 88%. Also, regular blood donation can lower the risk of severe cardiovascular events like stroke by 33%.


Stimulates the Production of New Red Blood Cells – The donor’s body immediately begins to replenish the lost red blood cells within 48 hours of blood donation. This process of replenishment can help the body stay healthy and work more efficiently.

Reduces the Risk of Cancer – According to study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, iron is believed to increase the free-radical damage in the body and has been linked to an increased risk of cancer and aging. According to the Miller-Keystone Blood Center, consistent blood donation is associated with a lower risk of cancers, (including liver, lung, colon, stomach and throat cancers).

Burns Calories – Blood donation helps burn about 650 calories for every pint i.e. 450 ml of blood given.


Free Blood Analysis – A blood donor receives a free prior health screening plus mini blood test. The HB level is tested, as well as blood pressure and body check is done. The donor is also screened for syphilis, HIV. hepatitis. and other diseases; and is immediately informed in strict confidentiality if any of these tests show positive results.

Side Effects of Blood Donation

There side effects of blood donation are potentially short-term, and depend on the type of product being donated, the body”s tolerance to the procedure, overall health of the donor. Common side effects may include-

These side-effects can be minimized by drinking plenty of water prior to donation, having a well-balanced meal before and after donating blood, and getting plenty of sleep on the night before blood donation.

Published on Mar 19, 2009
Last Updated on Aug 13, 2016

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.

According to a recent survey conducted by World Health Organisation, 52.42% of all blood donated in India is through voluntary blood donation camps. The figure was 45% in 2002. This shows that nearly 47.58% of all blood donated is either from paid donors or from family members.
Shazidamain Friday, June 14, 2013

i have donated my blood on 22 feb 2013. can i donate it again on 24 april 2013? i’m of 19 years
sriharsha.d Wednesday, April 24, 2013

kya jb koi physical ho to last night kya woh blood de sakta hai.
purnima.rajput Monday, April 22, 2013

Can I donate at a childrens’ hospital if i am taking balsalazide disodium fo colitis?
Michael48 Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Can I donate blood if a smoked weed.
Dominik Tuesday, December 11, 2012

your answer on interval between donations makes NO sense. It states that the normal interval is 56 days. But in men it is 3 months and in women 4 months. So normal for Martians? this destroys any credibility for your entire site.
TTB123 Tuesday, July 31, 2012

In Canada, Canadian Blood Services allows a person to donate blood every 56 days. The lifetime of a red bloodcell is 3-4 months, so maybe this is where you got this information from?
NSGSTDNT Sunday, November 25, 2012

i have hypertension 160/100mm hg can i donate blood.
umesh33 Friday, July 6, 2012

Really u have given good information about blood donation. atleast with this information someone change his mind and donate his blood. regularly.
venujustforu Monday, April 2, 2012

i have hypothryodism and i take thyrox 50 mg can i donate blood
sweta_25 Wednesday, December 21, 2011


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5 Surprising Health Benefits of Donating Blood #donating #clothes #to #charity


#advantages of blood donation

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5 Surprising Health Benefits of Donating Blood

You ve read the posters, heard the announcements and seen the big trucks community blood drives are often in the public eye. We often hear about the importance of donating blood as it relates to the recipients. One blood donation could help up to three patients. Just a few minutes out of your day could save someone s life.

But we don t often hear about the benefits of donating blood as it relates to the actual donors. While the impact is a little less obvious, there are several health advantages that come as a result of giving blood.

Perhaps you are considering donating blood but are unsure of the effect it will have on your body. Or maybe you ve done it before and are curious about how it might impact you if you donate regularly. In any case, you may be surprised at some of the advantages. We consulted with some health professionals to identify some of the biggest benefits of donating blood.

Donating blood can

1. Uncover potential health problems

While it isn t the same thing as a trip to the doctor, donating blood can be another way to keep an eye on your cardiovascular health. You ll receive a mini-physical prior to the blood draw, in which someone will check your pulse, blood pressure, body temperature, hemoglobin and more. This can sometimes shed light on issues you didn t even know about.

If your blood is too low in iron, the clinic will tell you and won t draw your blood , says Jan Patenaude, dietician and certified LEAP therapist. They will also inform you of any other blood issues they notice or if anything seems unusual. An occasional check up on your blood quality could be the key to spotting a health issue before it becomes life-threatening.

2. Reduce harmful iron stores

One in every two hundred people in the U.S. is affected by a condition called hemochromatosis and most don t even know it, according to Patenaude. Hemochromatosis is a disease that causes an iron overload and is labeled as the most common genetic disease among Caucasians by the Mayo Clinic.

A committed blood donor herself, Patenaude recommends donation as a way to reduce the body s extra iron stores. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the removal of red blood cells is the preferred treatment for patients with excess iron in their blood.

3. Reduce your risk of suffering a heart attack

Donating blood at least once a year could reduce your risk of a heart attack by 88 percent, according to a study conducted by the American Journal of Epidemiology .* This relates to the iron issue again, says Dr. David Dragoo, health care expert at Money Crashers.

Dr. Dragoo explains that high levels of iron in the blood constrict your blood vessels and create more risk of a heart attack. Depleting those extra iron deposits by donating blood gives your vessels more room to operate.

4. Reduce your risk of developing cancer

If you needed more examples of the detrimental effects of high iron levels, here you go! Excess iron has also been associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Phlebotomy was found to be an iron reduction method that is associated with lower cancer risk and mortality, according to a study published by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The study focused on patients affected by peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which the Mayo Clinic describes as a common circulatory problem. Patients who regularly donated blood had a lower risk of developing cancer than those who did not.

5. Give you a sense of significance

While there are several physical benefits to donating blood, the most powerful health benefit is arguably in the psychological realm. Donating blood means that someone (or multiple people) somewhere will be getting the help they desperately need.

Patenaude believes the psychological health benefit you receive from knowing you re helping others is just as helpful as the physical health benefit. When you roll up your sleeve and sit down in that chair, you know you re making a difference and that makes you feel good!

Everybody wins

Now you know there are multiple benefits of donating blood for both parties involved. Donating blood is good for you and it s even better for all the people whose lives depend on blood donations.

If you are interested in helping even beyond donating, you might want to consider becoming a phlebotomist yourself. Learn about a fewreasons you might consider becoming a phlebotomist!

*The study referenced was conducted on nearly 3,000 middle-aged men living in Eastern Finland.

External links provided on Rasmussen.edu are for reference only. Rasmussen College does not guarantee, approve, control, or specifically endorse the information or products available on websites linked to, and is not endorsed by website owners, authors and/or organizations referenced.

Brianna is a freelance writer for Collegis Education who writes student focused articles on behalf of Rasmussen College. She earned her MFA in poetry in 2014 and looks for any opportunity to write, teach or talk about the power of effective communication.

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The Health Benefits of Blood Donation #get #paid #to #donate #eggs


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You don t need a special reason to give blood. You just need your own reason. Some of us give blood because we were asked by a friend, some know that a family member or a friend might need blood some day and some just believe it is the right thing we do. Whatever your reason, the need is constant and your contribution is important for a healthy and reliable blood supply. And you ll feel good knowing you ve helped change a life.

Donating blood may not only benefit the person who received the blood cells but may also improve the health of the donor.

What are the potential health benefits of donating blood?
While the most obvious health benefit of donating blood is the wonderful feeling derived from giving something vital to someone who needs it, the benefits of donating blood may extend far beyond this to having a positive impact on the donor s health.

Studies have shown that, in general, Americans tend to consume more iron on a daily basis than is necessary for good health. Ingestion of quantities of iron beyond a certain quantity can promote formation of free radicals in the body. Free radicals have justly earned their reputation for causing cellular changes which can disrupt normal cell function and increase the risk of certain chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. This is more likely to be a problem for men and post menopausal women since women of child bearing age shed excess iron through regular menstrual cycles. If a person happens to be a red meat eater, the risk for iron overload can be even higher.

Studies have also shown that men who donate blood on a regular basis have a lower risk of heart disease. With heart disease being the number one cause of death in males, this is, indeed, an important health benefit of donating blood.

How can you be sure you re not giving away too much iron?
Before you re allowed to donate blood, your hemoglobin level, a rough measure of your iron levels, will be checked. If it s deemed too low, you will not be allowed to donate that day. Your hemoglobin level will be monitored closely every time you present for donation and you ll only be allowed to donate every eight weeks to prevent too much iron from being removed from your body. It s a free and easy way to keep track of your iron levels.

When you consider the potential health benefits of giving blood along with the joy of giving to others in need, it s no wonder the donation of blood has become so popular. An hour spent relaxing in a chair every two months is all it takes to benefit both your health and the health of a lucky recipient. Someone out there someone is waiting for your generous gift of life.

To find a blood drive near you, visit www.redcrossblood.org and be sure to check out the events calendar to see dates and times of Blood Drives hosted by Medical West!

Sources: www.redcrossblood.org, www.livestrong.com


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4 Unexpected Benefits of Donating Blood – Health News #donate #hair #for #cancer


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Photo: Getty Images

When s the last time you stopped to appreciate all the good stuff your blood does for you? Without it, oxygen would never reach your cells and carbon dioxide would be filling your blood vessels as we speak.

Every two seconds, someone in the United States needs blood and more than 41,000 blood donations are needed every day, according to the American Red Cross. So while you may never worry about having enough blood to function, plenty of others aren t as fortunate. With World Blood Donor Day approaching on Saturday, June 14, that gives you more reason than ever to get out and donate.

While giving blood should be all about helping those in need, there are a few things in it for you. Here are four health perks to becoming a blood donor:

Your blood may flow better

If blood has a high viscosity, or resistance to flow, it will flow like molasses, says Phillip DeChristopher, M.D. Ph.D. director of the Loyola University Health System blood bank. Repeated blood donations may help the blood flow in a way that s less damaging to the lining of the blood vessels and could result in fewer arterial blockages. That may explain why the American Journal of Epidemiology found that blood donors are 88% less likely to suffer a heart attack.

It s not clear if there are lasting health benefits associated with better blood flow. (These kinds of studies can t prove cause and effect—for example, blood donors might lead healthier lifestyles than the general population.)
What is clear is that blood donors seem to not be hospitalized so often and if they are, they have shorter lengths of stay, Dr. DeChristopher says. And they re less likely to get heart attacks, strokes, and cancers.

You ll get a mini check-up

Before you give blood, you ll first have to complete a quick physical that measures your temperature, pulse, blood pressure. and hemoglobin levels. After your blood is collected, it s sent off to a lab where it will undergo 13 different tests for infectious diseases, like HIV and West Nile virus. If anything comes back positive, you ll be notified immediately.

If year after year your tests come back negative, then you ll know for sure there s nothing you ve been exposed to, Dr. DeChristopher says. The physical and blood tests are no reason to skip your annual doctor visit, but they re good for peace of mind. But you should never donate blood if you suspect you might actually be sick or have been exposed to HIV or another virus.

Your iron levels will stay balanced

Healthy adults usually have about 5 grams of iron in their bodies, mostly in red blood cells but also in bone marrow. When you donate a unit of blood, you lose about a quarter of a gram of iron, which gets replenished from the food you eat in the weeks after donation, Dr. DeChristopher says. This regulation of iron levels is a good thing, because having too much iron could be bad news for your blood vessels.

The statistics appear to show that decreasing the amount of iron in otherwise healthy people over the long run is beneficial to their blood vessels, and diseases related to abnormalities in blood vessels, such as heart attack and stroke, he says.

Still, data from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that nearly 10% of women in the U.S. suffer from anemia. a condition where your body lacks red blood cells or hemoglobin (most commonly due to an iron deficiency ). In that case, it s best not to give blood until the anemia is resolved, he says.

Women who haven t hit menopause yet may find it hard to donate blood, too. Pre-menopausal females can be somewhat iron depleted with blood counts just under the lower limit, Dr. DeChristopher says. If you have low iron and you still want to be a donor, taking an oral iron supplement may help you re-qualify, he says.

You could live longer

Doing good for others is one way to live a longer life. A study in Health Psychology found that people who volunteered for altruistic reasons had a significantly reduced risk of mortality four years later than those who volunteered for themselves alone. While the health benefits of donating blood are nice, don t forget who you re really helping: A single donation can save the lives of up to three people, according to the Red Cross. The need for blood is always there, Dr. DeChristopher says. It s important to recognize how important willing donors are.

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Charitable Hospital – Health Care Related Nonprofit Organizations – Baru Sahib #money #for #blood

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Help us to save More Lives.

Help us save more lives, develop new treatments, build state of the art facilities and support our remarkable patients and their families.

With your donation we can continue to put the child first and always.

Primary Healthcare

Primary Healthcare for 30,000 OPD Patients annually

New better ways of Caring

Donations help us find new and better ways of caring for the patients we treat and to support their families at their most difficult time.

Charitable Hospital

Free of cost healthcare facilities are provided to underprivileged rural and hilly people, virtually at their doorsteps.

Services Provided

The Magic

This hospital caters to the medical needs of patients covering an area of a radius of 100 Km.

Alternative Medicines

Road Ahead

To establish Center for healthcare Medical Research under the umbrella of Guru Ki Kashi (Akal University)

Support Generously

Most of the young children in rural North India have to stay at home due to poverty and lack of educational opportunities around their villages. They indulge in household work or child labor. Your sponsorship could change that. Your donation is tax exempt. The Kalgidhar Society is a registered charitable organization in USA, Canada, UK and India.

How We Do?

Our Healthcare Facilities

TKT / TKS also run a 280-bed Charitable Hospital in the backward district of Sirmaur, Himachal Pradesh. More than 30,000 poor underprivileged patients annually are attended to with primary healthcare and emergency interventions.

Our Healthcare Facilities

Four Free Medical camps are held in Sirmaur every year wherein free expensive surgeries are provided to poor beneficiaries by Doctors from India and abroad.

In addition to the routine medical and surgical services, emergencies of all kinds are also attended. Akal Charitable Hospital is the only hospital in the region attending to the patients of snake-bite for which expensive antivenin is given.

The patients and their attendants travel to Akal Charitable Hospital by bus, horse or on foot, undertaking quite long and arduous journey on difficult terrains to get rid of deadly diseases completely free of cost, the treatments that would normally cost up to INR 100,000.

Services Provided

  • Internal medicine and Cardiology
  • Ophthalmology
  • Ear, Nose and Throat
  • Gynaecology and obstetrics
  • Dental problems
  • Eye Surgery
  • General Surgery
  • Gynae and Obstetric Surgery
  • ENT Surgery

Alternative Medicines

  • Homeopathy
  • Ayurvedic
  • Magnetotherapy
  • Accupressure
  • Naturopathy
  • Physiotherapy including massage and steam bath

Our Impact

Primary Healthcare for 30,000 OPD Patients annually

280 Bed World Class Charitable Hospital

100 + free operations annually

Testimonials / Research

We are greatful for the opportunity to have come here and spent 12 days in God’s Country. Beatiful vibrations, great views, excellent hikes, lovely children, generous hosts, good and spiritual discussions, innocent laughter. If heaven is possible in the realm of this world, it is here. To say “Thank You” will be seriously understanding our sentiments. Our vocabulary fails to describe our feelings of gratitude and bliss.

Dave S. Maan & Rani Maan, Operation Rainbow, Canada, 13767-55A Avenue, Surrey

A Divine experience. The inspiration behind this tremendous task shines in every part of this complex. Our prayers are offered to the almighty at this house of the Lord so that his mission is fully accomplished

Siddharth Chattopadhyaya, IG/Prov. BSF/HO’s, New Delhi

What I heard, it is much more than that. This is a place worth visiting and taking a part in this movement. Students of villages are being given Free Education and all other facilities. The Rural School results are highly impressive. Government of India, Indian State Governments Punjab Chief Minister should adopt this as a Model. Foreign students are happy. Baba Iqbal Singh is a blessed soul. May Satguru give all success to The Kalgidhar Trust!

Tarlochan Singh MP (RS). Former Chairman, National Minorities Commission, New Delhi

Kalgidhar Society aims to build superior human Character and high moral values as a way to establish permanent world peace.

KPMG. cutting through complexity


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Donated Dental Services – Dental Health Foundation #world #charities


#donated dental services

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Donated Dental Services

The mission of the WDA Foundation s Donated Dental Services (DDS) program is to help bring needed dental care to Wisconsin residents who are unable to afford treatment because of a limited income that is clearly linked to a permanent disability or advanced age (65 and older).

This program is by application only. Eligibility is determined based on a completed written application and phone interview by the DDS referral coordinator.

During the interview process, the applicant will be asked questions pertaining to income, expenses and other pertinent factors to determine financial need as well as services required.

Receipt of a written application by the DDS program does NOT guarantee treatment. The DDS program receives a substantial number of applications each year and as a charitable program, the availability of volunteer dentists and funding are limited.

When a patient is accepted into the program, he/she is put on a waiting list until a volunteer participating dentist becomes available. The number of individuals on the waiting list varies by county.

Wisconsin dentists who participate in the program have agreed to volunteer their services to one or two patients a year. Each volunteer dentist decides for him/herself whether to formally accept an individual based on a face-to-face meeting to assess dental needs. The referral coordinator is available to help the volunteers with such matters as a referral to a specialist and securing donated laboratory services if needed.*

Since 1998, 826 volunteer dentists have provided more than $9.9 million in comprehensive dental care at no charge to 3,403 adults in need. An additional $702,909 in supplies and services has been donated by 159 dental labs.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Delta Dental of Wisconsin Charitable Fund, Bader Philanthropies and WDA Insurance and Services Corp. provide financial support for administrative and lab costs, while participating dentists donate more than $8 in clinical expertise, treatment and materials for every one dollar in funding from the these entities. Private donations to the WDA Foundation. directed to support Donated Dental Services, also are gratefully accepted.

*The DDS program does not provide lifetime dental care. The dentists do not donate routine cleanings or examinations after the initial treatment plan is complete.

Decisions of the DDS program are final.

Prospective DDS patient applicants can learn more about the program by contacting your county Department of Aging, Health Human Services.

Get your smile back

DDS Patient Openings

The WDA Foundation’s Donated Dental Services (DDS) program is accepting patient applications in some counties. Individuals must be a county resident, have a permanent disability or age 65 or older and have limited income. Individuals cannot have access to dental insurance through the State of Wisconsin’s Medical Assistance Program, Medicare or private insurance.

This program is by application only. Eligibility is determined based on a completed written application and phone interview by the DDS referral coordinator.

Become a DDS volunteer

DDS Photo Gallery

Testimonials

From patients to their volunteer dentist or DDS program coordinators

“My life is forever changed for the better because of Donated Dental Services and enriched because of the wonderful personal attention provided.”

-DDS patient from La Crosse, Wis.

“I would like to thank you and everyone in your office for always being able to get me in to see you right away, it means a lot. Also for being so personable, you made me feel important and you really care about me as an individual.”

DDS patient from Adams County

“This experience was so impressive and uplifting. The kindness of strangers was overwhelming and created a strong bond and faith in people helping people.”

DDS patient from Pierce County

“I have been involved in the Donated Dental Services program since 1999…it is our pleasure to help because we know the patients are so grateful.”

-Dentist from Oshkosh, Wis.

“I believe this is a wonderful program and service. Patients I’ve seen are very grateful.”

-Dentist from Wauwatosa, Wis.

“Yesterday was our finish day. Everyone at our office was touched by this patient. We are so happy to have played a role in her treatment. She is truly a grateful and caring person.”

WDA Foundation

Get your smile back

DDS Patient Openings

The WDA Foundation’s Donated Dental Services (DDS) program is accepting patient applications in some counties. Individuals must be a county resident, have a permanent disability or age 65 or older and have limited income. Individuals cannot have access to dental insurance through the State of Wisconsin’s Medical Assistance Program, Medicare or private insurance.

This program is by application only. Eligibility is determined based on a completed written application and phone interview by the DDS referral coordinator.

Become a DDS volunteer

DDS Photo Gallery

Testimonials

From patients to their volunteer dentist or DDS program coordinators

“My life is forever changed for the better because of Donated Dental Services and enriched because of the wonderful personal attention provided.”

-DDS patient from La Crosse, Wis.

“I would like to thank you and everyone in your office for always being able to get me in to see you right away, it means a lot. Also for being so personable, you made me feel important and you really care about me as an individual.”

DDS patient from Adams County

“This experience was so impressive and uplifting. The kindness of strangers was overwhelming and created a strong bond and faith in people helping people.”

DDS patient from Pierce County

“I have been involved in the Donated Dental Services program since 1999…it is our pleasure to help because we know the patients are so grateful.”

-Dentist from Oshkosh, Wis.

“I believe this is a wonderful program and service. Patients I’ve seen are very grateful.”

-Dentist from Wauwatosa, Wis.

“Yesterday was our finish day. Everyone at our office was touched by this patient. We are so happy to have played a role in her treatment. She is truly a grateful and caring person.”


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Organ Donor Health Medical Persuasive Essays – The Importance of Organ Donation #donate #a

#organ donation persuasive speech

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The Importance of Organ Donation

The Importance of Organ Donation

Each day approximately 6,300 people die and what makes this haunting is that presently there are 83,513 people waiting for organs to be donated, yet each day 17 people die because they do not receive a transplant (http://www.donatelife.net/facts_stats.html). These statistics show that people who are waiting for organ transplants have a good chance at being saved and get what they need. The sad truth is though, because of the lack of people willing to donate organs, many people will continue to wait for organs to save their lives. Waiting lists of patients for organ transplants become longer as the need for transplantable organs increases? (Sheehy 1). Think back to how someone might feel when a close family member or friend dies. With out argument, the feeling one experiences when going through a time like that is one of the most painful experiences. The feeling when one gets when they know that they will never again see the person you loved so much, never hold them, touch them, experience their presence. It is a horrible feeling. What many do not realize is simply by donating organs, you can help someone else not have to deal with that pain.

Organ donation is when someone who has died, has previously given permission for their organs to be taken from their body and transplanted into someone else?s who because of some sort of medical condition, can not survive off of their own. At the time of death one?s heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, lung, pancreas, pancreas islet cell, heart valves, bone, skin, corneas, veins, cartilage, and tendons can all be used for transplantation. Choosing to donate organs is beneficial to many people, morally the right thing to do when you pass on and, is also one of the most important ways for survival of many people.

Organ donation is often perceived with doubt because many people do not know the truth. There are many myths out about the donating of organs that cause many people to opt not to. What many do not realize is the truth about organ donation. The body of the donor after the surgery is not mangled up and is presentable for the funeral. Organ donation is ethical and should not be looked down upon. Organ donating is there to save lives, not to hurt anyone. Many people think that they should be paid or given something in return for donating their organs, which is.

. middle of paper.

. en through the example of Nickolas Green, when you donate organs you not only save one life, but often numerous. Your body has so many vital organs and tissues that can be donated and given to many different people. For many of these people, what you donate to them, can be a matter of life or death. If they don?t receive a donation soon enough, their time will run out and they will pass away. By donating organs you are giving of your body, something that will never again by seen after death. You are making the morally correct decision to help others. It seems we are all brought up to help others and give of yourself, and what better way to do so then by donating of your organs.

When you go to get your drivers licence, be sure to mark that you will donate. Put yourself in the shoes of someone waiting for a donation. They hear of people dying and yet nothing will happen for their benefit if these people don?t choose to donate. Picture you husband or wife, on their death bed unless someone will donate their organs. Make the right decision to bring happiness out of death. Do not put your organs to waste, help those in need, and choose to donate.

Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper


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Cancer Center – Everyday Health #blood #donation #nz


#cancer charity

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Your profile

Cancer Center

After a cancer diagnosis — whether it’s your own or that of a loved one — the right information can be one of your most powerful weapons. Here’s what you need to know about cancer treatment and management.

Cancer in the simplest terms is the abnormal growth of cells somewhere in the body. Each year, more than a million people receive a cancer diagnosis, and the most common types of cancer include breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer.

In addition to the three major types of cancer treatment — surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy — researchers are working to find new and more effective ways of fighting cancer. Some cancers can’t be prevented, but other types can be avoided by living a healthy lifestyle.

Cancer Conditions

Cancer Basics

Cancer is often feared and misunderstood, and there are many misconceptions about this disease. But education is the best defense, so don’t believe the common cancer myths. Although signs vary among the different types of cancer, cancer symptoms can include pain, fatigue, and unexplained weight loss. Depending on your cancer stage. you and your treatment team will come up with a cancer treatment plan that’s right for you. You may also be interested in enrolling in a cancer clinical trial. which can offer access to newer and more experimental therapies.

Cancer Management

A cancer diagnosis can affect every aspect of the patient’s life, including work. financial issues. appearance and sexuality. Coping with cancer treatment is never easy, but following healthy lifestyle practices, like eating right. exercising. and dealing with your emotions can help. There are also many treatment options for easing cancer pain. Cancer caregivers should also be sure to look after themselves to keep up with this demanding role.

Cancer Blogs

Join in the discussion and learn from others who are facing the challenges of cancer in their daily lives.


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