Tag: charitable

GFCF – Charitable Grants, charitable organization.#Charitable #organization


Charitable Grants

The Glaser Family Charitable Foundation is a family foundation that was established in 2001 and is located in Bonham, Texas. The foundation has a broad range of philanthropic interests. The Glaser Family Foundation exists to strengthen educational and cultural opportunities, protect children’s health, and support Christian ministries.

The Glaser Family Charitable Foundation can distribute grants only to qualified public entities or 501(c)(3) charities.

The Foundation neither lends nor grants money to individuals.

Application Requirements

and Review Process

The Foundation strives to be responsive to the needs of all eligible organizations and considers requests of any amount. There is no formal application form. Grants are accepted throughout the year and will be awarded in June (deadline for application by May 1) and in December (deadline for application by November 1). Applicants will be notified whether or not their grant request is approved at that time. Each organization is limited to one application within a twelve-month period.

At this time, only grant proposals from Fannin County and the surrounding area will be considered, unless the organization that is applying is a previous grant recipient.

Applications should include:
  • A brief history of the organization and description of existing services (if applicable, please include website address, current programs and accomplishments, current number of staff, and volunteers, and current population served, e.g., number served per year, geographic location, socio-economic status, ethnicity, gender, or age)
  • A description of the proposed program
  • The specific dollar amount requested from the Foundation and date payment is needed
  • A list of all entities asked to give financial support to the proposed project (include their responses to date and dollar amount committed)
  • A project budget including income and expenses
  • A plan to evaulate the project (please include measurable, time-specific goals, a description of information to be collected to measure progress and how that information will be collected)
  • A list of trustees or directors and corporate officers that includes: titles for board of directors, profession, ethnicity and gender
  • Names and qualifications of staff involved with the proposed project
  • The organization’s current operating budget and year-to-date financial statements
  • The last certified audit (if a young agency, send the last fiscal year’s statements and the last IRS Form 990 filed)
  • A copy of the latest verification of tax-exempt status from the Internal Revenue Service under Section 170 of the IRS code
Address grant correspondence to:

Glaser Family Charitable Foundation


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What Is a Charitable Organization, charitable organization.#Charitable #organization


What Is a Charitable Organization?

Charitable organization

Charitable organizations vary according to the country and region in which they operate.

Donations image by Rebs O from Fotolia.com

Related Articles

  • 1 [Nonprofit Organizations] | What Is the Purpose of Nonprofit Organizations?
  • 2 [Not-for-Profit Organization] | For Profit vs. Not-for-Profit Organization
  • 3 [Public Nonprofit Organization Vs.] | What Is the Definition of a Public Nonprofit Organization Vs. a Private Nonprofit Organization?
  • 4 [Different Types] | Different Types of Nonprofit Organizations

Charitable organizations are a kind of business that fits within the nonprofit organization (NPO) category. In general, this type of entity is sometimes referred to as a charity or foundation, which can be run publicly or privately. Some charities may be centered around religious, educational or other public interest activities that are philanthropic in nature. Depending upon the location of the charity, the legal definition of what constitutes a charitable organization may vary according to its country of origin. Therefore, the tax implications for a charity will also depend upon the region or country in which the charitable organization operates.

Qualifying Factors

The procedures for forming the various kinds of charitable organizations vary from state to state in the United States, as well as other countries and regions within them. Registration and filing requirements for entities that engage in charitable activities and solicit contributions are also determined by its originating state or region. Charitable organizations must comply with federal tax relief guidelines, as specified by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). For a charitable organization to qualify as tax exempt, it must refrain from certain activities, such as political campaign and candidate fundraising, and earnings may not benefit any individual.

Private Foundations

Some charitable organizations operate as private foundations that obtain their principal funding through a corporation, family, individual or other single financial source that does not solicit public funding. Private foundations usually use endowment funds to provide grants to outside or affiliated organizations that support the foundation objectives. These kinds of charitable organizations are often referred to as non-operating, such as with the Bill amp; Melinda Gates Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation.

Public Charities And Operating Foundations

Public, operating foundations or charities usually receive grants from the government, private foundations and individuals. Although some public charities may engage in grant making activities, the majority of them are concerned with tax-exempt activities. Examples of operating foundations include the American Cancer Society, the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation and the World Wildlife Fund, all of which service society and seek public contributions.

Federal Tax Benefits

Federal tax relief and benefits are provided to most nonprofit charitable organizations, which are recognized as exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC). Some of the benefits of tax relief status can include the ability to receive tax deductible charitable contributions and no requirement to pay income tax for the organization. Most charitable organizations must formally apply to the IRS to obtain tax exempt status. The charity must be formally organized as a trust, corporation or unincorporated association. Also, the charitable organization s operating documents, which may be articles of incorporation, articles of association or trust documents, must specify its purposes strictly and permanently as being dedicated to charitable purposes.

Types of Charitable Organization Activities

Kinds of charitable organizations that are considered organized for public benefit can include those which offer relief for the poor, distressed or underserved, and those with religious, educational or scientific affiliations. Some charitable organizations are engaged in the creation and management of monuments, public buildings or works. Many charities work to enhance society by offering social services, lessen government burden and combat community deterioration. The defense of public safety, children, civil rights, and elimination of prejudice and discrimination are some other social centric activities that charities concern themselves with.


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Charitable Contributions: How Much Can You Write Off, charitable contributions.#Charitable #contributions


What would you like to talk about?

Charitable contributions

Charitable Contributions: How Much Can You Write Off?

Americans are generous individuals. From corporations to private citizens, Americans gave an estimated $241 billion to charitable organizations in 2003, according to the study “Giving USA 2004.” So when tax time rolls around, it’s always nice to see your charitable contributions pay off as a charitable deduction. The question is: while contributing may be good for the soul, how good is it really on your tax return?

The IRS has a limit on giving, but even if your heart exceeds the IRS maximum, you may still be able to benefit from your generous spirit. You may deduct a maximum of up to 50% of your adjusted gross income (AGI) (Line 36 on IRS Form 1040) for the tax year the donation was given. However, if you give more than 50%, the excess may be carried forward for up to five years. Be aware that the 50% rule applies to most contributions, but certain contributions may have lower limits.

What Is Tax-Deductible? How is it Deducted?

Now that you’ve figured out how much you can deduct, the next question is what exactly is tax deductible and how is it deducted? If you donate money or property to a “qualified organization,” your donation can be deducted by filing Form 1040 and itemizing the deduction on Schedule A. If you do not itemize your deduction using Schedule A, you cannot deduct your charitable contribution.

“Qualified organizations” include nonprofit groups that are religious, charitable, educational, scientific or literary in purpose, and nonprofit groups that work to prevent cruelty to children or animals. The following types of organizations qualify for a deduction:

  • Churches, synagogues, temples, mosques and other religious organizations.
  • Federal, state and local governments, if your contribution is used for public purposes.
  • Nonprofit schools and hospitals.
  • Public parks and recreation facilities.
  • Salvation Army, Red Cross, CARE, Goodwill, United Way, Boy and Girl Scouts, etc.
  • War veterans’ groups.
  • Expenses paid for a student living with you, sponsored by a qualified organization.

On the other hand, the types of organizations below do not qualify for a charitable deduction:

  • Civic leagues, social and sports clubs, labor unions and chambers of commerce.
  • Foreign organizations (except certain Canadian, Israeli and Mexican charities).
  • For-profit organizations.
  • Lobbying or lawmaking organizations.
  • Lottery, bingo or raffle tickets.
  • Dues, fees or bills paid to social or recreational clubs.
  • Homeowners’ associations.
  • Individuals.
  • Political groups or candidates for public office.

Keep Those Records for Cash Donations

It is extremely important to get receipts and keep records for your donations. If you make a cash donation of less than $250, a canceled check or a receipt from the charity showing its name, the amount and the date of the contribution is sufficient. However, contributions of more than $250 require written documentation from the charitable organization. This receipt must include the amount you gave and whether or not you received anything of value as a result of your contribution.

Donating Property? Don’t Forget That Receipt!

Like cash donations, if you donate property (defined as anything that is not cash) to a charitable organization, the records you must keep depend on the value of the property you contribute. A contribution of less than $250 requires a receipt from the charity showing the charity’s name, the date of the donation, and the location and description of the property donated. In addition to a receipt, donations between $250 and $500 require written acknowledgment of your contribution from the charity, stating whether the organization gave you any goods or services as a result of your contribution.

Donations of property valued between $500 and $5,000 require detailed records of how you initially got the property and the approximate date you received it, in addition to a receipt and written acknowledgment. You must file Form 8283, Noncash Charitable Contributions, for all donations of property valued at more than $500. In addition to every requirement stated above, contributions over $5,000 require a written appraisal from a qualified professional.

Please note that property donations of more than $500 made on or after January 1, 2005 will require written documentation from the charity indicating whether or not the property will be sold or used by the organization. You will not be able to receive a charitable deduction without this documentation.

Drive Away with a Tax Deduction

Instead of trying to sell that old Chevy, you can donate it to a charitable organization and, in return, receive a guaranteed tax deduction. If you donated a car to a charitable organization in 2004, you can deduct the fair market value of the car. The fair market value of a vehicle can be found on Web sites such as the “Kelley Blue Book” (www.kb.com). However, the rules change in 2005. As of January 1, 2005, you can no longer deduct the fair market value of a vehicle if the charity sells it; you can only deduct the amount the charity receives from the sale of the car.

As for all donations of property, you must file Form 8283 when deducting a vehicle donation. This will allow you to describe the condition of the car and how you determined the value. For deductions of more than $5,000, you must attach a copy of an appraisal, made by a qualified professional, to your tax return, in addition to the appraisal portion of Form 8283.

Can I deduct charitable contributions, even if I receive something in return?

If you make a contribution to an organization and receive something in return, you may still be able to get a deduction on your taxes. However, your deduction is limited to the excess of what you gave over the value of what you received. For example, if you gave $100 to a charity dinner and the dinner was worth $30, you can deduct $70. If you make a contribution of more than $75 and receive goods or services, the charity must give you a written statement that tells you the value of those goods or services.

To learn more about charitable contributions and potential tax benefits, sign up for the LegalZoom business legal plan and speak to a tax attorney or tax professional. When you sign up for the LegalZoom business legal plan, you will have access to unlimited attorney consultations on new legal matters and tax advice from tax professionals for a low monthly fee.


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Charitable Contribution Deductions, Internal Revenue Service, charitable contributions.#Charitable #contributions


Charitable Contribution Deductions

This article generally explains the rules covering income tax deductions for charitable contributions by individuals. You can find a more comprehensive discussion of these rules in Publication 526, Charitable Contributions, and Publication 561, Determining the Value of Donated Property. For information about the substantiation and disclosure requirements for charitable contributions, see Publication 1771. You can obtain these publications free of charge by calling 1-800-829-3676.

You may deduct charitable contributions of money or property made to qualified organizations if you itemize your deductions. Generally, you may deduct up to 50 percent of your adjusted gross income, but 20 percent and 30 percent limitations apply in some cases. Exempt Organizations Select Check uses deductibility status codes to identify these limitations.

Qualified Organizations

You may deduct a charitable contribution made to, or for the use of, any of the following organizations that otherwise are qualified under section 170(c) of the Internal Revenue Code:

  1. A state or United States possession (or political subdivision thereof), or the United States or the District of Columbia, if made exclusively for public purposes;
  2. A community chest, corporation, trust, fund, or foundation, organized or created in the United States or its possessions, or under the laws of the United States, any state, the District of Columbia or any possession of the United States, and organized and operated exclusively for charitable, religious, educational, scientific, or literary purposes, or for the prevention of cruelty to children or animals;
  3. A church, synagogue, or other religious organization;
  4. A war veterans’ organization or its post, auxiliary, trust, or foundation organized in the United States or its possessions;
  5. A nonprofit volunteer fire company;
  6. A civil defense organization created under federal, state, or local law (this includes unreimbursed expenses of civil defense volunteers that are directly connected with and solely attributable to their volunteer services);
  7. A domestic fraternal society, operating under the lodge system, but only if the contribution is to be used exclusively for charitable purposes;
  8. A nonprofit cemetery company if the funds are irrevocably dedicated to the perpetual care of the cemetery as a whole and not a particular lot or mausoleum crypt.

Timing of Contributions

Contributions must actually be paid in cash or other property before the close of your tax year to be deductible, whether you use the cash or accrual method.

Deductible Amounts

If you donate property other than cash to a qualified organization, you may generally deduct the fair market value of the property. If the property has appreciated in value, however, some adjustments may have to be made.

The rules relating to how to determine fair market value are discussed in Publication 561, Determining the Value of Donated Property.

Limitations on Deductions

In general, contributions to charitable organizations may be deducted up to 50 percent of adjusted gross income computed without regard to net operating loss carrybacks. Contributions to certain private foundations, veterans organizations, fraternal societies, and cemetery organizations are limited to 30 percent adjusted gross income (computed without regard to net operating loss carrybacks), however. Exempt Organizations Select Check uses deductibility status codes to indicate these limitations.

The 50 percent limitation applies to (1) all public charities (code PC), (2) all private operating foundations (code POF), (3) certain private foundations that distribute the contributions they receive to public charities and private operating foundations within 2-1/2 months following the year of receipt, and (4) certain private foundations the contributions to which are pooled in a common fund and the income and corpus of which are paid to public charities.

The 30 percent limitation applies to private foundations (code PF), other than those previously mentioned that qualify for a 50 percent limitation, and to other organizations described in section 170(c) that do not qualify for the 50 percent limitation, such as domestic fraternal societies (code LODGE).

A special limitation applies to certain gifts of long-term capital gain property. A discussion of that special limitation may be found in Publication 526, Charitable Contributions.

Foreign Organizations

The organizations listed in Exempt Organizations Select Check with foreign addresses are generally not foreign organizations but are domestically formed organizations carrying on activities in foreign countries. These organizations are treated the same as any other domestic organization with regard to deductibility limitations.

Certain organizations with Canadian addresses listed may be foreign organizations to which contributions are deductible only because of tax treaty. Besides being subject to the overall limits applicable to all your charitable contributions under U.S. tax law, your charitable contributions to Canadian organizations are subject to the U.S. percentage limits on charitable contributions, applied to your Canadian source income. A deduction for a contribution to a Canadian organization is not allowed if the contributor reports no taxable income from Canadian sources on the United States income tax return, as described in Publication 597.

Except as indicated above, contributions to a foreign organization are not deductible.

Reliance on Exempt Organizations Select Check

Revenue Procedure 2011-33, 2011-25 I.R.B. 887 describes the extent to which grantors and contributors may rely on the listing of an organization in electronic Publication 78 and the IRS Business Master File extract) in determining the deductibility of contributions to such organization. Grantors and contributors may continue to rely on the Pub.78 data contained in Exempt Organizations Select Check to the same extent provided for in Revenue Procedure 2011-33.

Similar reliance provisions apply to an organization’s foundation classification as it appears in the list. See also Revenue Procedure 89-23.


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Income tax and charitable organisations (Charitable organisations), charitable organisations.#Charitable #organisations


Charitable organisations

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Charitable organisations

Income tax and charitable organisations

Registration of charities

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Charitable organisations and community housing

Charitable organisations and the Student Loan Scheme

Guidelines for non-resident charities

Charitable bodies requesting overseas donee status

Income tax and charitable organisations

Charitable organisations can receive many types of income, including subscriptions, grants, subsidies, donations or koha, fees, raffle money, trading profits, and proceeds from selling assets. There are income tax exemptions available if they are registered with Charities Services.

Registering with Charities Services

You can find out how to register with Charities Services on their website.

Once Charities Services have approved your registration, they will send you a registration certificate and letter, as well as our leaflet Tax information for charities registered under the Charities Act 2005 (IR256) advising you about the exemptions available to registered charities.

As the registration process of Charities Services meets most of the requirements for income tax exemption, you don’t have to provide us with your organisation’s founding documents. We no longer issue letters confirming tax-exempt status. However, if you require an exemption from RWT (resident withholding tax) you will need to complete an Application for exemption from resident withholding tax on interest and dividends (IR451) and send it to us.

You will be expected to self-assess your tax-exempt status annually.

Some organisations may have rules that prevent additions or alterations to the charitable objects, personal benefit and winding up clauses without first getting our approval.

If you are registering your charitable organisation with Charities Services, we don’t need to give approval for changes to rules. Instead,we give general consent to any amendment removing such a rule. We recommend that you remove this requirement from your rules.

When charitable organisations are liable for income tax

Charitable organisations are liable for income tax if they:

  • operate without written rules, constitution or trust deed
  • operate under a set of rules, a constitution or a trust deed that does not meet the requirements for an income tax exemption
  • use business income for charitable purposes outside New Zealand
  • are not registered by Charities Services.

Paying income tax

Income tax rates can vary for your organisation, depending on whether you’re incorporated or unincorporated. You may also need to pay provisional tax.

Getting an IRD number

Any type of charitable organisations you are running will need an IRD number.

Registering for GST and PAYE

You may also need to register for GST and PAYE.

Filing income tax returns

When charitable organisations are exempt from income tax

The Income Tax Act 2007 and the Estate and Gift Duties Act 1968 set out a number of income tax and duty exemptions. Some of these exemptions give benefits to charitable organisations and some give benefits to people or companies who make donations to these organisations.

There are generally two main conditions that a charitable organisation must meet to qualify for any of the exemptions:

  • The organisation’s aims and activities must be exclusively charitable.
  • None of the organisation’s income or funds may be used (or be available for use) to benefit any of its members, trustees or associates.

Your responsibilities if you are exempt from income tax

If your charitable organisation is assessed as being fully exempt from income tax, you don’t need to file an income tax return unless we ask for one. However, you still need to keep accurate records for the organisation.

Banks and other financial institutions that pay interest are required to deduct RWT (resident withholding tax) from interest. Charities are eligible for an exemption from RWT. You can request an exemption from RWT (resident withholding tax) by completing an Application for exemption from resident withholding tax on interest and dividends (IR451) and sending it to us.


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Charitable Organizations, Charitable Donations, charitable organisations.#Charitable #organisations


Charitable Organizations

Charitable organisations

Charitable Organizations Can Help Children and Adults

Your Charitable Donations Help Find Treatments and Cures

Nonprofits and charities of all sorts benefit millions of people around the world each year. While the vast majority are truly altruistic in their endeavors, others are less so. If you are considering making a charitable donation, we hope you will take a few minutes to investigate your options. You should be confident that the dollars you give are going directly to the cause, not to overhead expenses.

Charitable organizations vary greatly with respect to not only causes but also in the efficiency of their operation. ANRF funds research to help find the cures and relief for arthritis sufferers. Over 90% of your charitable donations to this nonprofit go directly into research projects to help both children and adults that suffer from various forms of arthritis. Other charitable organizations may pass through less than 25% of the donations they collect with the balance spent on overhead and other expenses.

There are several charity evaluators that measure the efficiency of a charity’s operations. A leader in these evaluations is CharityNavigator.org. In 2013 they named ANRF as the #1 truly exceptional, “Charity to Watch.” Also, in 2014, they awarded ANRF their highest rating of four stars for the 6 th consecutive year!

It pays to do a little research before making a charitable donation to a non-profit organization. Some people refer to charitable giving as paying it forward, others call it generosity or philanthropy. Regardless of the name, charitable donations make this world a much better place and reflect the best of our human spirit. It feels good to give, knowing we are helping others in need.

ANRF supports numerous research projects across the country that focus on different types of arthritis. Our donors make charitable donations to the specific type of research they d like to support: Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, Juvenile Arthritis, plus general donations.

Help Support Arthritis Research

In addition to supporting a specific type of arthritis, ANRF provides various ways to give, including honorary gifts made in memory or honor of a loved one, planned giving that is part of estate planning, monthly donations, traditional one-time charitable donations, and you can even donate a car or other motor vehicle. To learn more about the ways you can help, please visit our Make a Donation page.

Arthritis affects millions of people every day. It can be a debilitating condition for both the young and old. Hospitalization, pain, and reduced ability to perform basic daily functions can be part of this disease. Typically, it involves inflammation of the joints, leading to pain and, in some cases, deformities. The pain can be constant and is normally localized to the area of inflammation, though in some cases, the pain radiates or extends far beyond the affected area. There are over 100 different forms of arthritis and the ANRF focuses its research on the most common and debilitating types of arthritis.

Your gifts fund research at the leading research institutes across the country. Please click here to learn more about the research we currently support.


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Funding of non-charitable organisations, charitable organisations.#Charitable #organisations


Funding of non-charitable organisations

Commission reminds trustees to undertake due diligence when making grants.

Charitable organisations

The Charity Commission is reminding charities to exercise greater vigilance when considering funding non-charitable bodies, to ensure that funds are used only for charitable activities which further the purposes of their charity and do not expose it to reputational risks or other risks that impact on public trust and confidence in charity.

Trustees must undertake reasonable due diligence to ensure that they are protecting the charity’s funds and reputation when making grants.

What is inappropriate funding?

Funding other charities or non-charitable organisations can be an effective way to further a charity’s purposes.

But charities must only fund activities that further their charitable purposes and trustees must ensure they take steps to protect their charity’s assets and reputation.

Failure by trustees to ensure charitable funds are applied in accordance with their charity’s purposes and their duties as trustees would give rise to regulatory concerns and require the commission to get involved. The following scenarios would give rise to serious regulatory concerns:

a charity funds activities that are either not charitable or not capable of furthering the charity’s specific purposes

trustees do not undertake appropriate due diligence or adequately ring fence grants in the hands of recipients or have not taken adequate steps to protect the charity’s position and ensure proper use of the charity’s funds

trustees risk their charity’s reputation by making grants without fulfilling their legal duties

trustees fail to take adequate steps to monitor the use of funding their charity has provided

Trustees’ legal duties and responsibilities

Trustees must be clear about what their charity hopes to achieve and how funding a certain organisation will help them achieve that aim.

The commission expects trustees to:

follow the commission’s guidance on decision making, including by acting in good faith, informing themselves adequately, taking account of all relevant factors and disregarding irrelevant ones, seeking professional advice where relevant and ensuring any decision is within the range of decisions a reasonable trustee body may make

assess whether the grant would pose reputational risks for the charity

compare their charity’s objects with those of the proposed recipient

carry out appropriate due diligence checks on the proposed recipient

set proportionate terms and conditions that restrict what the funds can be spent on

take reasonable and appropriate steps to monitor how their charity’s funds are used

seek repayment if funds are not spent in accordance with the charity’s terms and conditions

Wider issues for trustees to be aware of

Some charitable purposes such as community development and the promotion of human rights are difficult to interpret. While both these purposes can be charitable, not all activities that fall under these headlines are capable of being charitable. This means that trustees considering funding organisations to pursue community development or to promote human rights must take particular care to assure themselves that the grant will be used only to fund activities that further their charity’s purposes.

Some activities, such as political campaigning, are only permissible within certain boundaries. Charities must follow the commission’s guidance on campaigning and political activity.


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Charity Ratings, America s Most Independent, Assertive Charity Watchdog, CharityWatch, charitable organizations.#Charitable #organizations


Give Thoughtfully

CharityWatch , founded 25 years ago as the American Institute of Philanthropy (AIP) , is America s most independent, assertive charity watchdog. CharityWatch does not merely repeat what a charity reports using simplistic or automated formulas. We dive deep to let you know how efficiently a charity will use your donation to fund the programs you want to support. CharityWatch exposes nonprofit abuses and advocates for your interests as a donor.

Charitable organizations

Detailed information about the charities which earn Top-Rated status from CharityWatch is now available to the public.

Crowdfunding Popularity Continues to Soar Despite Risks to Donors

Several years ago most people probably had never heard the word crowdfunding Defined as the process of funding a project.

Costly and Continuous Kars4Kids Ads Disguise Charity s Real Purpose

Described by many as annoying and by SFGate com as the subject of widespread ubiquitous hate the catchy advertising jingle.

Reported Charity Salaries May Not Tell the Full Story

Donors often seek out information on charity executive salaries when considering whether or not to donate to a particular nonprofit.

The Senate Singles Out WWP For Bad Practices That Also Occur At Other Charities

Multiple media outlets including CBS News and The New York Times accused WWP of wasting donations on lavish spending such.

“CharityWatch has warned in advance of coming scandals at Feed the Children, Central Asia Institute, and Wounded Warrior Project. “

“Indeed, knowing how your dollars or donations will be used during and beyond an event is important before you give, [CharityWatch president, Daniel] Borochoff said. ‘Sometimes a charity will raise more money than is needed for the cause, which could open the door for the charity to take advantage of having the overflow money,’ he said. ‘Find out how the money will be used and earmark your donation for a specific disaster so it’s clear how you want your money allocated.’ “


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Nevada Secretary of State: Charitable Organizations, charitable organizations.#Charitable #organizations


Nevada Secretary of State

Charitable Organizations

Soliciting Charitable Contributions in Nevada

Charitable Organizations must register with the Nevada Secretary of State’s office before soliciting charitable contributions in Nevada. Assembly Bill 50 of the 2015 Nevada Legislature provides the basis for which Nevada law requires registration of Charitable Organizations as well as disclosure requirements for all solicitations for contributions, donations, gifts, or the like.

Generally, any solicitation for a contribution, even if the nonprofit organization is not a Charitable Organization, must contain the full legal name of the Charitable Organization or nonprofit organization, the physical address of the principal place of business, a published phone number or the internet website address, a statement or description of the purpose of the organization, and a statement as to whether the contribution is tax deductible pursuant to section 170(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. Please see sections 16 and 17 of Assembly Bill 50 for certain exceptions to the solicitation disclosure requirements.

Registration to solicit charitable contributions in Nevada is accomplished by filing a Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement (CSRS) with the Secretary of State’s Commercial Recording Division. The CSRS reports information about the Charitable Organization, and must be filed annually by the Charitable Organization if it continues to solicit contributions in Nevada.

Section 15 of Assembly Bill 50 exempts certain Charitable Organizations from the registration requirement. In order to claim exemption from the registration requirements, the Charitable Organization must file the Exemption from Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement (CSRX) form.

Organizations that File an Annual List of Officers with the Nevada Secretary of State’s Office

Domestic entities formed with the Nevada Secretary of State’s Office, and foreign entities already qualified to “do business” in Nevada, file the Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement, or if applicable, the Exemption from Charitable Registration Statement, at the time of filing the Annual List of Officers.

Organizations that Do Not File an Annual List of Officers with the Nevada Secretary of State’s Office

Charitable Organizations that do not file an Annual List of Officers with the Nevada Secretary of State’s office may file a Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement (CSRS), or if applicable, the Exemption from Charitable Registration Statement (CSRX), by completing the appropriate form below:

Like the Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement, the Exemption from Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement must be filed annually.

Once completed, please submit to the Nevada Secretary of State’s Commercial Recordings Division at:

Nevada Secretary of State’s Office

Commercial Recordings Division

202 North Carson Street

Carson City, NV 89701

101 N Carson Street Suite 3 Carson City, NV 89701 | (775) 684-5708


Tags : ,

Charitable Organizations, Charitable Donations, charitable organizations.#Charitable #organizations


Charitable Organizations

Charitable organizations

Charitable Organizations Can Help Children and Adults

Your Charitable Donations Help Find Treatments and Cures

Nonprofits and charities of all sorts benefit millions of people around the world each year. While the vast majority are truly altruistic in their endeavors, others are less so. If you are considering making a charitable donation, we hope you will take a few minutes to investigate your options. You should be confident that the dollars you give are going directly to the cause, not to overhead expenses.

Charitable organizations vary greatly with respect to not only causes but also in the efficiency of their operation. ANRF funds research to help find the cures and relief for arthritis sufferers. Over 90% of your charitable donations to this nonprofit go directly into research projects to help both children and adults that suffer from various forms of arthritis. Other charitable organizations may pass through less than 25% of the donations they collect with the balance spent on overhead and other expenses.

There are several charity evaluators that measure the efficiency of a charity’s operations. A leader in these evaluations is CharityNavigator.org. In 2013 they named ANRF as the #1 truly exceptional, “Charity to Watch.” Also, in 2014, they awarded ANRF their highest rating of four stars for the 6 th consecutive year!

It pays to do a little research before making a charitable donation to a non-profit organization. Some people refer to charitable giving as paying it forward, others call it generosity or philanthropy. Regardless of the name, charitable donations make this world a much better place and reflect the best of our human spirit. It feels good to give, knowing we are helping others in need.

ANRF supports numerous research projects across the country that focus on different types of arthritis. Our donors make charitable donations to the specific type of research they d like to support: Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, Juvenile Arthritis, plus general donations.

Help Support Arthritis Research

In addition to supporting a specific type of arthritis, ANRF provides various ways to give, including honorary gifts made in memory or honor of a loved one, planned giving that is part of estate planning, monthly donations, traditional one-time charitable donations, and you can even donate a car or other motor vehicle. To learn more about the ways you can help, please visit our Make a Donation page.

Arthritis affects millions of people every day. It can be a debilitating condition for both the young and old. Hospitalization, pain, and reduced ability to perform basic daily functions can be part of this disease. Typically, it involves inflammation of the joints, leading to pain and, in some cases, deformities. The pain can be constant and is normally localized to the area of inflammation, though in some cases, the pain radiates or extends far beyond the affected area. There are over 100 different forms of arthritis and the ANRF focuses its research on the most common and debilitating types of arthritis.

Your gifts fund research at the leading research institutes across the country. Please click here to learn more about the research we currently support.


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