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Personal Health Benefits, Donate Blood, Save Lives – Nebraska Community Blood Bank, benefits of

benefits of blood donation

Blood donation benefits more than just those who receive blood. Donating blood is advantageous for the giver as well.

Personal and health benefits include:

  • Free health screening. Every time you give blood, your blood pressure, pulse, temperature, and hemoglobin level are checked.
  • Boosts the production of red blood cells. Donation of blood reduces the number of red blood cells in the blood. The bone marrow immediately begins to replenish the lost cells. As a result, the blood of a donor is refreshed every time they donate because of the increased production of new blood cells.
  • Feel good! Giving feels great, especially when you understand that one hour of your time and one blood donation can make such a difference.

News, Events and Resources

Nebraska Community Blood Bank welcomes new bloodmobile

October 24, 2017 (Lincoln, NE) –Nebraska Community Blood Bank (NCBB) officially welcomed a brand new bloodmobile to our fleet.

Battle of the Badges Competition Comes to an End

Benefits of blood donation

September 6, 2017 (Lincoln, NE) – From July 21 through the month of August, Lincoln Police Department (LPD) and Lincoln Fire Rescue (LFR) competed in a Battle of the Badges blood drive helping Nebraska Community Blood Bank (NCBB) increase blood donations over the summer.

Bryan Trauma Center and NCBB Join Forces for free Stop the Bleed Training

Benefits of blood donation

Whether it’s a shooting, car crash or any other accident, would you know how to help victims who are severely bleeding? Learn how to Stop the Bleed.


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5 Impressive Benefits of Blood Donation

Health benefits of donating blood include good health and reduced risk of cancer and hemochromatosis. It helps in reducing the risk of damage to liver and pancreas. Donating blood may help in improving cardiovascular health and reducing obesity.

Table of Contents

Blood Donation

Every day blood transfusions take place that saves lives of many people all over the world. About 5 million Americans need a blood transfusion. Donating blood is good for the health of donors as well as those who need it. It is important that blood donation takes place in a hospital, a clinic or a blood bank, in the presence of medical experts. Donors should ensure that they are in good health to avoid any health issues post-transfusion to those who use it.

Donating blood can help in treating patients suffering from cancer, bleeding disorders, chronic anemia associated with cancer, sickle cell anemia, and other hereditary blood abnormalities. It is important to know that human blood cannot be manufactured, people are the only source of it and that is why it is important to donate blood and help those who need it. It is also possible to store your own blood for your future needs. Make sure the blood is stored at a good blood bank.

A mini health exam that includes a checklist for diseases related to blood pressure and infectious diseases should be conducted before initiating the collection of blood. Those who have medical conditions such as AIDS and hepatitis should not donate blood. People who have taken vaccinations or have undergone any surgery or have cancer, diabetes, cold, and flu should consult health experts before donating blood. Pregnant women should seek expert advice before donating blood. Benefits of blood donation

Health Benefits of Donating Blood

Blood donation not only makes the receiver s life good but also helps the donor to maintain good health. The benefits are mentioned below.

Prevents Hemochromatosis

Health benefits of blood donation include reduced risk of hemochromatosis. Hemochromatosis is a health condition that arises due to excess absorption of iron by the body. This may be inherited or may be caused due to alcoholism, anemia or other disorders. Regular blood donation may help in reducing iron overload. Make sure that the donor meets the standard blood donation eligibility criteria.

Anti-cancer Benefits

Blood donation helps in lowering the risk of cancer. By donating blood the iron stores in the body are maintained at healthy levels. A reduction in the iron level in the body is linked with low cancer risk.

Maintains Healthy Heart Liver

Blood donation is beneficial in reducing the risk of heart and liver ailments caused by the iron overload in the body. Intake of iron-rich diet may increase the iron levels in the body, and since only limited proportions can be absorbed, excess iron gets stored in heart, liver, and pancreas. This, in turn, increases the risk of cirrhosis, liver failure, damage to the pancreas, and heart abnormalities like irregular heart rhythms. Blood donation helps in maintaining the iron levels and reduces the risk of various health ailments.

Weight loss

Regular blood donation reduces the weight of the donors. This is helpful to those who are obese and are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases and other health disorders. However, blood donation should not be very frequent and you may consult your doctor before donating blood to avoid any health issues.

Stimulates Blood Cell Production

After donating blood, the body works to replenish the blood loss. This stimulates the production of new blood cells and in turn, helps in maintaining good health. Benefits of blood donation

Blood Donation Process

It is always good to plan blood donation in advance. Consult your doctor before donating blood if there are any health issues or concerns. It is always good to have healthy diet weeks before the donation. On the day of donation, make sure you are well hydrated, so keep drinking plenty of fluids. One should wear comfortable clothes during the donation process. In case you are undergoing any treatment or medication, it is advisable to inform the blood bank/clinic/hospital where you are donating blood.

How often can you Donate Blood?

One has to wait for 56 days or 8 weeks between whole blood donations. The waiting period is 112 days or 16 weeks between power red donations. Avoid donation if you re suffering from any disorders, and consult your doctor before doing it.

How much Blood do you Donate?

You can donate one unit or 350 ml of blood every 8 weeks. Organizations such as American Red Cross organize donation camps where one can participate and donate blood. You can also donate blood at any hospital.

How Old do you Have to be to Donate Blood?

Donor s age must be between 18-60 years and their weight should be more than 45 kgs to be able to donate blood. Any healthy person can donate blood after the required gap of 56 days. This wait time helps to replenish the blood levels in the donor s body

How to Donate Bone Marrow?

The first step towards bone marrow donation is sharing your details with bone marrow registers/websites. When a donation is needed, doctors would find the matching tissue type and contact you.

Individuals below the age of 18 and above 60 and with weight lower than 110 lbs cannot donate blood. A person with active infection, acute infection or diseases like HIV AIDS should not donate blood. It is advisable to consult a doctor and share medical history before going for blood donation.

Donate blood, stay healthy, and save lives!


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5 Surprising Health Benefits of Donating Blood

You ve read the posters, heard the announcements and seen the big trucks community blood drives are often in the public eye. We often hear about the importance of donating blood as it relates to the recipients. One blood donation could help up to three patients. Just a few minutes out of your day could save someone s life.

But we don t often hear about the benefits of donating blood as it relates to the actual donors. While the impact is a little less obvious, there are several health advantages that come as a result of giving blood.

Perhaps you are considering donating blood but are unsure of the effect it will have on your body. Or maybe you ve done it before and are curious about how it might impact you if you donate regularly. In any case, you may be surprised at some of the advantages. We consulted with some health professionals to identify some of the biggest benefits of donating blood.

Donating blood can

1. Uncover potential health problems

While it isn t the same thing as a trip to the doctor, donating blood can be another way to keep an eye on your cardiovascular health. You ll receive a mini-physical prior to the blood draw, in which someone will check your pulse, blood pressure, body temperature, hemoglobin and more. This can sometimes shed light on issues you didn t even know about.

If your blood is too low in iron, the clinic will tell you and won t draw your blood , says Jan Patenaude, dietician and certified LEAP therapist . They will also inform you of any other blood issues they notice or if anything seems unusual. An occasional check up on your blood quality could be the key to spotting a health issue before it becomes life-threatening.

2. Reduce harmful iron stores

One in every two hundred people in the U.S. is affected by a condition called hemochromatosis and most don t even know it, according to Patenaude. Hemochromatosis is a disease that causes an iron overload and is labeled as the most common genetic disease among Caucasians by the Mayo Clinic.

A committed blood donor herself, Patenaude recommends donation as a way to reduce the body s extra iron stores. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the removal of red blood cells is the preferred treatment for patients with excess iron in their blood.

3. Reduce your risk of suffering a heart attack

Donating blood at least once a year could reduce your risk of a heart attack by 88 percent, according to a study conducted by the American Journal of Epidemiology.* This relates to the iron issue again, says Dr. David Dragoo, health care expert at Money Crashers.

Dr. Dragoo explains that high levels of iron in the blood constrict your blood vessels and create more risk of a heart attack. Depleting those extra iron deposits by donating blood gives your vessels more room to operate.

4. Reduce your risk of developing cancer

If you needed more examples of the detrimental effects of high iron levels, here you go! Excess iron has also been associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Phlebotomy was found to be an iron reduction method that is associated with lower cancer risk and mortality, according to a study published by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The study focused on patients affected by peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which the Mayo Clinic describes as a common circulatory problem. Patients who regularly donated blood had a lower risk of developing cancer than those who did not.

5. Give you a sense of significance

While there are several physical benefits to donating blood, the most powerful health benefit is arguably in the psychological realm. Donating blood means that someone (or multiple people) somewhere will be getting the help they desperately need.

Patenaude believes the psychological health benefit you receive from knowing you re helping others is just as helpful as the physical health benefit. When you roll up your sleeve and sit down in that chair, you know you re making a difference and that makes you feel good!

Everybody wins

Now you know there are multiple benefits of donating blood for both parties involved. Donating blood is good for you and it s even better for all the people whose lives depend on blood donations.

If you are interested in helping even beyond donating, you might want to consider becoming a phlebotomist yourself. Learn about a few reasons you might consider becoming a phlebotomist!

*The study referenced was conducted on nearly 3,000 middle-aged men living in Eastern Finland.

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Benefits of blood donation

Brianna Flavin

Brianna is a freelance writer for Collegis Education who writes student focused articles on behalf of Rasmussen College. She earned her MFA in poetry in 2014 and looks for any opportunity to write, teach or talk about the power of effective communication.


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Benefits Of Blood Donation

Benefits of blood donationBenefits Of Blood donation

Doing good to someone in need not only helps the needy but also gives a psychological satisfaction to the donor. One of the easiest, but valuable donations is the donation of blood for the needy. It not only has the power of giving a new life to the lucky recipient, but also offers numerous health benefits to the donor. The health benefits of donating blood include:

1.Beneficial for the human heart.

Increase in the levels of iron in blood makes a person prone to the risk of heart diseases. Excessive iron present in the blood causes oxidation of cholesterol. The product of oxidation gets deposited on the walls of arteries, increasing the chances of heart attack and strokes. Regular blood donation helps to maintain level of iron in blood, thus reducing the risk of heart diseases.

2.Boosts the production of red blood cells.

Donation of blood reduces the number of red blood cells in the blood. The bone marrow immediately replenishes the lost number of RBCs. As a result the blood of donor is refreshed every time the blood is donated. Therefore blood donation helps to stimulate the production of new blood cells.

Blood donation is the easiest method of diet and burning calories. Donating about 450 ml helps to burn approximately 650 calories in the donor s body.  It is thus helpful in weight loss.

4.Aids in fighting hemochromitosis

Hemochromitosis or iron overload disorder is a genetic disorder in which iron gets accumulated in the body tissue. The main cause of this problem is improper metabolism of iron in the body. This condition can even lead to organ damage. People with small iron overload can easily donate blood and lower their blood iron content. This will help to fight this disease and such blood is safe for the recipients as the problem is of genetic origin.

5.Makes the donor psychologically rejuvenated.

Donating a priceless thing to a needy, gives the donor a psychological satisfaction. Health y elderly people feeling revitalized or reenergized by donating blood regularly.

6.Donors automatically warned of serious illnesses.

The blood of donor is tested before each donation. The tests include HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Syphilis and malaria. The donor is informed about the positivity of any such disease.

Just spent an hour relaxing and donating blood every two months. This will not only give you the joyous feeling of helping a needy but also provide numerous benefits to your health.


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Benefits Of Donating Blood

Benefits of blood donation

Benefits of Donating Blood

There are many benefits you can reap by donating blood regularly. Apart from saving lives, you also get an opportunity to enjoy snacks and free juice after donating blood. Moreover, you will have better physical shape and improved fitness level compared to people who don t donate, and you have lower risk of severe disease such as heart attack.

Donating blood is proven to help reduce your chance of cancer, according to recent studies. Regular donation helps lower chance of cancer, including throat, stomach, liver and colon cancer. Studies have shown that regular blood donation improve cardiovascular health.

2. Lower cholesterol level

Reduce cholesterol level in your bloodstream by donating blood, and minimize the chance of developing common heart disease such as arteriosclerosis. According to recent findings, high cholesterol level lead to risk of heart disease and plaque of the arteries. Moreover, donating blood help lower high iron levels responsible for cardiovascular disease.

3. Protects you from heart attack risk

Did you know that donating blood is good for heart health? Well, regular donors have reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Donating blood regularly also reduces your risk of stroke and heart complications such as arteriosclerosis.

Improve function of the immune system by donating blood regularly. Once you donate blood, the body replenishes the blood volume and red blood cells are replaced within four weeks. This is beneficial to your health as it improve blood circulation and oxygen circulation throughout the body. Also, replenishing red blood cells can help improve your overall health.

5. Facilitates production of red blood cells

As you donate blood, level of red blood cells significantly reduce. Therefore, donating blood regularly help in the production of red blood cells that transport oxygen throughout the body.

A slight pain is evident when you donate blood, but there is no need for you to worry since the process last a few minutes.


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How to Donate Blood

Donating blood is a small sacrifice that can make a big difference. Fortunately, the process is an easy one, and only requires you to make a few simple preparations. First, contact your local health clinic or blood drive program to find out whether you’re an eligible donor. On the day of the donation, bring 2 valid forms of photo ID, wear short-sleeved or loose-fitting clothing, and make sure you’re properly fed and hydrated. Following a short review of your medical information, you’ll get a little poke and be sent on your way with the satisfaction of knowing you’ve helped save a life.

Steps Edit

Part One of Three:

Getting Ready to Give Blood Edit

Blood donation pictures

Blood donation pictures

Blood donation pictures

Blood donation pictures

Blood donation pictures

Blood donation pictures

Part Two of Three:

Completing the Donation Process Edit

Blood donation pictures

Blood donation pictures

Part Three of Three:

Recovering from Giving Blood Edit

Blood donation pictures

Blood donation pictures

Blood donation pictures


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Am I Eligible – Blood Centers of the Pacific, requirements to donate blood.#Requirements #to

requirements to donate blood

Requirements to donate blood

Am I Eligible

Find out if you are eligible to donate blood.

  • Homepage
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  • Am I Eligible

General Requirements for Blood Donation

Blood Donor Qualifications: (English) (Spanish)
  • Age: 18(16 and 17 year-olds can donate with a Minor Donor Permission Form signed by a parent or guardian)(Spanish)
  • Weight: At least 110 lbs

(different requirements for 16-22 year-olds see Blood Donor Qualifications)

  • Health: General good health
  • Identification: Valid identification such as a driver’s license,

    DMV identification card, passport, etc.

  • Quick Tips:
    • Diet: A well-balanced meal is recommended within four hours of donation.
    • Hydrate: Being well-hydrated helps donors maintain blood volume and can prevent dizziness or fainting.

    Requirements to donate blood

    Do not donate if any of the following apply to you:
    • HIV/AIDS: You are a person with symptoms or laboratory evidence of HIV infection.
    • Cancer: Hematological, ie: Hodgkin, Leukemia, Lymphomas.
    • Hepatitis: A history of the disease after the age of 11, or a positive lab test for the virus.
    • Organ Failure: Kidney, lung or liver failure.
    • Recreational Drug Use (by injection): Having injected yourself with drugs not prescribed by a physician.
    • United Kingdom: You have visited or lived in England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Isle of Man, Channel Islands, Gibraltar or Falkland Islands for a total of 3 months or more from 1980 thru 1996.
    • European Countries: If you have spent a cumulative of 5 years or more since 1980.
    • U.S. Military/Dependents/Civilian Military Employee: If you are U.S. Military/Dependent/Civilian Military Employee who spent a cumulative of six months or more between 1980 thru 1996 associated with a military base in Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy or Greece, and/or 1980 thru 1990 in Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany.
    • Sexual History: You have engaged in sex for money or drugs since 1977.

    Travel

    • Travel to certain countries may temporarily restrict you from donating blood. Please call 888-393-4483 for more information or click here.

    Questions About Eligibility

    You may need to wait before donating blood if any of the following apply:


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    Donating Blood

    According to the American Red Cross, there’s a 97% chance that someone you know will need a blood transfusion. Blood donors especially donors with certain blood types are always in demand.

    Donating blood

    To donate blood, the American Red Cross requires that people be at least 17 years old and weigh more than 110 pounds. (In some states, the age is 16 with a parent’s permission.)

    Donors must be in good health and will be screened for certain medical conditions, such as anemia. Donors who meet these requirements can give blood every 56 days.

    Before Donating

    Blood donation starts before you walk in the door of the blood bank. Eat a normal breakfast or lunch this is not a good time to skip meals but stay away from fatty foods like burgers or fries. And be sure to drink plenty of water, milk, or other liquids.

    Before donating, you’ll need to answer some questions about your medical history, and have your temperature, pulse, blood pressure, and blood count checked. The medical history includes questions that help blood bank staff decide if a person is healthy enough to donate blood. They’ll probably ask about any recent travel, infections, medicines, and health problems.

    Donated blood gets tested for viruses, including HIV (the virus that causes AIDS), hepatitis B, hepatitis C, syphilis, and West Nile virus. If any of these things are found, the blood is destroyed. Because blood can be infected with bacteria as well as viruses, certain blood components are tested for contamination with bacteria as well.

    What’s It Like to Donate Blood?

    The actual donation takes about 10 minutes. It’s a lot like getting a blood test. After you’re done, you’ll want to sit and rest for a few minutes, drink lots of fluids, and take it easy the rest of the day (no hard workouts!). Your local blood bank or Red Cross can give you more information on what it’s like and what you need to do.

    Are There Any Risks?

    A person can’t get an infection or disease from giving blood. The needles and other equipment used are sterile and they’re used only on one person and then thrown away. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates U.S. blood banks. All blood centers must pass regular inspections in order to keep operating.

    Sometimes people who donate blood notice a few minor side effects like nausea, lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting, but these symptoms usually go away quickly.

    The donor’s body usually replaces the liquid part of blood (plasma) within 72 hours after giving blood. It generally takes about 4 8 weeks to regenerate the red blood cells lost during a blood donation. An iron-fortified diet plus daily iron tablets can help rebuild a donor’s red blood supply.

    The Red Cross estimates that 15% of all blood donors in the United States are high school or college students an impressive number when you consider you have to be 16 or 17 to donate blood. If you are eligible and want to donate blood, contact your local blood bank or the American Red Cross for more information on what’s involved. You could save someone’s life.


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    7 Things to Know Before You Donate Blood – ABC News, donating blood.#Donating #blood


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    7 Things to Know Before You Donate Blood

    Donating blood

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    The summer’s no vacation for blood banks, and this one has been especially hard: Just after the fourth of July, the American Red Cross issued an emergency call for blood and platelet donations. This time of year, “blood donors are typically out of town and unable to give,” explains Justin Kreuter, MD, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Center in Rochester, Minnesota; or they may not be eligible to donate after traveling to certain areas outside the United States. “It really hits us in the summer months,” Dr. Kreuter says. Your community needs your help now; here’s what you should know about pitching in.

    Eligibility is always changing, and Zika’s a concern this year

    The Red Cross maintains an alphabetical list of eligibility criteria for potential donors—from acupuncture (thumbs up) to Zika (thumbs down)—and can give you the latest information on whether or not you’re good to give. There have been no reported cases of Zika transmission via blood transfusion so far, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), but there’s a strong possibility that the virus can be transmitted that way. “What we’re doing now, per the FDA, is deferring [donors who may have been exposed to Zika] for 28 days, which is twice the known period of infectivity,” Dr. Kreuter says. Because Zika can be transmitted by sexual contact (via semen) as well, women with male partners who have visited Zika-affected areas are deferred for three additional months.

    The FDA regulates donor blood just as aggressively as it regulates drugs

    “It takes a lot of money to do the infectious-disease testing that we do [on donor blood], and when we create blood products out of the donation, that’s done to the same standards as any drug manufactured in this country. The FDA holds us to those same standards, so it’s a very high level of quality and also resources that are invested,” Dr. Kreuter explains. “These tests and high standards are what’s keeping the blood supply safe, so that if my wife or one of my daughters needs a blood transfusion, I can feel assured that I can just sit at their bedside and hold their hand rather than worry about what that might result [in] for them later down the road.”

    You’ll get a mini-physical before you donate

    The flip side of donor blood screening (which ensures that it’s safe for the eventual recipient) is confirming the donor’s health (which ensures that the blood draw won’t have a negative effect on them). “We check blood pressure and pulse, we do a pinprick to check red blood cells to make sure they’re safe—we don’t want to make our donors iron deficient,” Dr. Kreuter says. He makes no specific suggestions about what you eat and drink prior to donation; just be sure you have breakfast and lunch under your belt, and take it easy on caffeine. “We all live on our daily espressos and whatnot, but we see donors who show up and haven’t eaten [meals] and they’ve only been drinking coffee, and they’re quite dehydrated. When you donate you’re losing circulating fluid, so the water that you drink before and after your donation is important.”

    You’ll hardly feel a thing—seriously

    The needles used to collect blood are a bit larger than those you’d encounter when, say, receiving a flu shot, but the so-called ‘small pinch’ you feel at insertion is, truly, no big deal. “What we feel [at the start of a blood draw] is just on the surface of our skin. These needles have silicone on them, they’re made to glide and be quite comfortable. After that initial stick, you’re not going to feel anything,” Dr. Kreuter says. If needles give you the shivers, look away for the quarter-second in which yours is placed; then ask a staffer to cover up the insertion site for you. Since the “tough” part is already over, you can lie back and spend the next eight to 10 minutes zoning out.

    It’s okay to have a cookie after you donate

    “What’s healthy is to keep a balanced diet as you go forward in the day [after your donation],” Dr. Kreuter says. “We tend to stock our canteen area with things like water and juice and then salty snacks, because salt helps you retain a little more of the [water] volume that you’ve lost through donation. The cookies are there because [they’re] something the donor culture has grown up in—maybe not the healthiest option, but certainly an expectation. Believe it or not, I have meetings about cookies. I’ve seen shirts before that say ‘I donate for the cookies.’” Bottom line: Rewarding yourself with a treat isn’t going to do any harm, provided that you indulge in moderation.

    Your blood could save patients who haven’t even entered the world yet

    Though many of us are reminded of the importance of blood donation when tragedies happen, much of what we give does the quiet work of saving people who’ll never show up on the news. Since the need for blood doesn’t go away, the best way to save lives is to contribute regularly. “At Mayo, about 15% to 20% of our blood is going to trauma patients and being used in our ER; a lot of our blood gets used supporting patients through life-saving cardiac or cancer surgeries. Cancer patients [also need blood]—chemotherapy knocks down their ability to make their own red blood cells and platelets—and folks who have medical conditions like autoimmune diseases also need transfusions.”

    Donations flow to delivery rooms, too: “If anemia is significant enough in utero we transfuse during pregnancy and sometimes immediately after delivery,” Dr. Kreuter explains. “A lot of kids need blood in the first couple of minutes of life. Sometimes with newborn babies an emergency platelet transfusion in the first few moments of life is absolutely necessary; in their situation the newborn brain is so delicate and fragile that having these platelets immediately available is the name of the game in order to prevent bleeding into their brains, which results in long-term disabilities.”

    Note that platelets have a shelf life of just five days, while whole blood can be stored for up to six weeks. The immediate need for platelets—and platelet donors—is constant.

    Donating your voice is vital, too

    Those “Be nice to me, I gave blood today!” stickers aren’t merely a cute (and justified) humblebrag: They’re also a benevolent form of peer pressure, not unlike the “I voted” stickers we earn and wear on election days. “Hearing about blood donation from a friend or colleague is very motivating in getting [potential first-timers] to think about taking that next step,” Dr. Kreuter says. “Our donor population [in Rochester] has an older average age, and we’re trying to reach out to the younger generation to start having the same blood donation habits.”

    Think about it this way: Taking your kids to see you strengthen your community’s heartbeat at a blood center is just as important as bringing them with you to the voting booth. Donate visibly, donate vocally, and donate as often as you can.


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    5 Surprising Health Benefits of Donating Blood

    You ve read the posters, heard the announcements and seen the big trucks community blood drives are often in the public eye. We often hear about the importance of donating blood as it relates to the recipients. One blood donation could help up to three patients. Just a few minutes out of your day could save someone s life.

    But we don t often hear about the benefits of donating blood as it relates to the actual donors. While the impact is a little less obvious, there are several health advantages that come as a result of giving blood.

    Perhaps you are considering donating blood but are unsure of the effect it will have on your body. Or maybe you ve done it before and are curious about how it might impact you if you donate regularly. In any case, you may be surprised at some of the advantages. We consulted with some health professionals to identify some of the biggest benefits of donating blood.

    Donating blood can

    1. Uncover potential health problems

    While it isn t the same thing as a trip to the doctor, donating blood can be another way to keep an eye on your cardiovascular health. You ll receive a mini-physical prior to the blood draw, in which someone will check your pulse, blood pressure, body temperature, hemoglobin and more. This can sometimes shed light on issues you didn t even know about.

    If your blood is too low in iron, the clinic will tell you and won t draw your blood , says Jan Patenaude, dietician and certified LEAP therapist . They will also inform you of any other blood issues they notice or if anything seems unusual. An occasional check up on your blood quality could be the key to spotting a health issue before it becomes life-threatening.

    2. Reduce harmful iron stores

    One in every two hundred people in the U.S. is affected by a condition called hemochromatosis and most don t even know it, according to Patenaude. Hemochromatosis is a disease that causes an iron overload and is labeled as the most common genetic disease among Caucasians by the Mayo Clinic.

    A committed blood donor herself, Patenaude recommends donation as a way to reduce the body s extra iron stores. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the removal of red blood cells is the preferred treatment for patients with excess iron in their blood.

    3. Reduce your risk of suffering a heart attack

    Donating blood at least once a year could reduce your risk of a heart attack by 88 percent, according to a study conducted by the American Journal of Epidemiology.* This relates to the iron issue again, says Dr. David Dragoo, health care expert at Money Crashers.

    Dr. Dragoo explains that high levels of iron in the blood constrict your blood vessels and create more risk of a heart attack. Depleting those extra iron deposits by donating blood gives your vessels more room to operate.

    4. Reduce your risk of developing cancer

    If you needed more examples of the detrimental effects of high iron levels, here you go! Excess iron has also been associated with an increased risk of cancer.

    Phlebotomy was found to be an iron reduction method that is associated with lower cancer risk and mortality, according to a study published by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The study focused on patients affected by peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which the Mayo Clinic describes as a common circulatory problem. Patients who regularly donated blood had a lower risk of developing cancer than those who did not.

    5. Give you a sense of significance

    While there are several physical benefits to donating blood, the most powerful health benefit is arguably in the psychological realm. Donating blood means that someone (or multiple people) somewhere will be getting the help they desperately need.

    Patenaude believes the psychological health benefit you receive from knowing you re helping others is just as helpful as the physical health benefit. When you roll up your sleeve and sit down in that chair, you know you re making a difference and that makes you feel good!

    Everybody wins

    Now you know there are multiple benefits of donating blood for both parties involved. Donating blood is good for you and it s even better for all the people whose lives depend on blood donations.

    If you are interested in helping even beyond donating, you might want to consider becoming a phlebotomist yourself. Learn about a few reasons you might consider becoming a phlebotomist!

    *The study referenced was conducted on nearly 3,000 middle-aged men living in Eastern Finland.

    This piece of ad content was created by Rasmussen College to support its educational programs. Rasmussen College may not prepare students for all positions featured within this content. Please visit www.rasmussen.edu/degrees for a list of programs offered. External links provided on rasmussen.edu are for reference only. Rasmussen College does not guarantee, approve, control, or specifically endorse the information or products available on websites linked to, and is not endorsed by website owners, authors and/or organizations referenced. Rasmussen College is a regionally accredited private college and Public Benefit Corporation.

    Donating blood

    Brianna Flavin

    Brianna is a freelance writer for Collegis Education who writes student focused articles on behalf of Rasmussen College. She earned her MFA in poetry in 2014 and looks for any opportunity to write, teach or talk about the power of effective communication.


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