Tag: benefits?

Why Donating Blood Is Good For Your Health, benefits of blood donation.#Benefits #of #blood

US / World

Policy / Biz

Drugs

Why Donating Blood Is Good For Your Health

Benefits of blood donation

Blood donors have a lower risk of developing life-threatening diseases. Staff Sgt. Stephanie Rubi, U.S

It’s time to roll up your sleeve and save a life — including yours.

Every two seconds, someone in the United States needs blood, with a total of 44,000 blood donations needed every day, reports the American Red Cross. One whole blood donation, which takes approximately 45 minutes to an hour, can come to the rescue of as many as three patients.

Harold Mendenhall, an 84-year-old lifetime blood donor from South Florida, donated his 100th gallon of blood, The Palm Beach Post reported. He started giving blood on July 7, 1977 when his wife, Frankie, was diagnosed with breast cancer. After she died, going to the blood bank was a way Mendenhall could deal with the grief of losing his wife and later his two sons. At least, he could save those who needed a blood transfusion.

Mendenhall, strong and healthy, donates 6 gallons of blood a year by platelets. In a platelet donation, a machine withdrawals the blood, filters out the platelets, and returns the rest of the blood to the donor, according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. This donation procedure takes 70 to 90 minutes and can be done once every seven days, allowing for the donor to give blood every few weeks instead of the eight weeks of waiting required for a non-platelet donation. Whole blood donors can also donate platelets 72 hours after a whole blood donation, and vice versa.

Blood donors must be 17 years old in most states, with some states lowering the limit to 16 years old with parental consent. Donors ages 16 to 18 are also subject to additional height and weight restrictions, says the New York Blood Center. A single individual who donates whole blood starting at 17 years old every 56 days until they reach 76 will have donated 48 gallons of blood, potentially saving more than 1,000 lives, says the American Red Cross.

While the health benefits of recipients who receive blood transfusions are clear, altruistic blood donors too, can reap the benefits.

Preserves Cardiovascular Health

Blood viscosity is known to be a unifying factor for the risk of cardiovascular disease, says the Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide. How thick and sticky your blood is and how much friction your blood creates through the blood vessels can determine how much damage is done to the cells lining your arteries. You can reduce your blood viscosity by donating blood on a regular basis, which eliminates the iron that may possibly oxidize in your blood. An increase in oxidative stress can be damaging to your cardiovascular system.

Blood donation reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes, too. In a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers found that participants ages 43 to 61 had fewer heart attacks and strokes when they donated blood every six months. In a study published by the American Journal of Epidemiology, researchers found in a sample size of 2,682 men in Finland, those who donated blood a minimum of once a year had an 88 percent lower risk of heart attacks than those who did not donate.

The removal of oxidative iron from the body through blood donations means less iron oxidation and reduced cardiovascular diseases.

Reduces The Risk of Cancer

The reduction of iron stores and iron in the body while giving blood can reduce the risk of cancer. Iron has been thought of to increase free-radical damage in the body and has been linked to an increased risk of cancer and aging, says a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Researchers followed 1,200 people split into groups of two over the course of 4 ½ years. One group reduced their iron stores by blood donations twice a year, whereas the other group did not make any changes. The results of the study showed that the group of blood donors had lower iron levels, and a lower risk of cancer and mortality.

The Miller-Keystone Blood Center says that the consistency of blood donations is associated with lower risks of cancers including liver, lung, colon, and throat cancers due to the reduction in oxidative stress when iron is released from the bloodstream.

Burns Calories

People burn approximately 650 calories per donation of one pint of blood, according to the University of California, San Diego. A donor who regularly donates blood can lose a significant amount of weight, but it should not be thought of as a weight loss plan by any means. To donate blood the American Red Cross requires donors to weigh at least 110 pounds and maintain healthy iron levels in the body.

Provides A Free Blood Analysis

Upon donation, donors are tested for syphilis, HIV, hepatitis, and other diseases. Testing indicates whether or not you are eligible to donate based on what is found in your bloodstream, says the American Red Cross. The organization also notes that a sample of your blood may be used now or in the future for additional tests and other medical research with your consent.


Tags : , , ,

Personal Health Benefits, Donate Blood, Save Lives – Nebraska Community Blood Bank, benefits of

benefits of blood donation

Blood donation benefits more than just those who receive blood. Donating blood is advantageous for the giver as well.

Personal and health benefits include:

  • Free health screening. Every time you give blood, your blood pressure, pulse, temperature, and hemoglobin level are checked.
  • Boosts the production of red blood cells. Donation of blood reduces the number of red blood cells in the blood. The bone marrow immediately begins to replenish the lost cells. As a result, the blood of a donor is refreshed every time they donate because of the increased production of new blood cells.
  • Feel good! Giving feels great, especially when you understand that one hour of your time and one blood donation can make such a difference.

News, Events and Resources

Nebraska Community Blood Bank welcomes new bloodmobile

October 24, 2017 (Lincoln, NE) –Nebraska Community Blood Bank (NCBB) officially welcomed a brand new bloodmobile to our fleet.

Battle of the Badges Competition Comes to an End

Benefits of blood donation

September 6, 2017 (Lincoln, NE) – From July 21 through the month of August, Lincoln Police Department (LPD) and Lincoln Fire Rescue (LFR) competed in a Battle of the Badges blood drive helping Nebraska Community Blood Bank (NCBB) increase blood donations over the summer.

Bryan Trauma Center and NCBB Join Forces for free Stop the Bleed Training

Benefits of blood donation

Whether it’s a shooting, car crash or any other accident, would you know how to help victims who are severely bleeding? Learn how to Stop the Bleed.


Tags : , , ,

Skin Treatment: 6 Amazing Benefits Of Donating Blood, benefits of donating blood.#Benefits #of #donating

Skin Treatment

Simple treatment for our skin

6 Amazing Benefits Of Donating Blood

Are you thinking of donating blood? Is something stopping you? Then it s high time you knew the benefits of donating blood. Yes, you read that right. Blood donation comes with many health benefits. Also, just because it s beneficial, it doesn t mean anybody can donate blood.

Would you like to know more? Keep reading!

Blood Donation A Brief:

In 2014, the World Health Organization commemorated World Blood Donor Day (14th June) with the theme Safe Blood for Saving Mothers . Around 800 women die every day due to pregnancy complications or problems related to childbirth, according to WHO. Then there are people, who need blood urgently because they have sustained injuries, had surgical procedures or have a blood-related condition. It is people like these that you end up helping without even knowing when you donate blood. This altruism will make you feel good.

However, there are many more benefits of blood donation that you could be unaware of. These are benefits that you can reap by becoming a regular blood donor.

Here are some of the benefits of blood donation that you will experience, should you become a donor.

1. Improved Blood Flow:

According to Harvard Medical School health guide for family, there is a connection between the thickness of blood (viscosity) and arterial damage (1). When the viscosity of blood is high, your blood becomes thick and sticky. As a result, it causes more friction while flowing through blood vessels, thereby damaging the cells lining the arteries. You can reduce the viscosity of blood by regularly donating blood. This also gets rid of iron from the blood that tends to cause oxidative stress, which can damage the cardiovascular system irreparably.

2. Reduced Risk Of Heart Attacks And Strokes:

A study published in the Journal of American Medical Association states if the iron content in blood is high, it increases the risk of coronary heart disease (2). The study found that when research participants aged between 43 and 61 years donated blood every 6 months, they suffered from fewer strokes and heart attacks.

Another study conducted in Finland and published in the American Journal of Epidemiology found that when men donated blood at least once a year, it reduced their risk of heart attacks by 88 percent, compared to those men who didn t donate(3).

3. Reduced Risk Of Cancer:

You also can reduce your risk of developing cancer. According to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, by reducing iron store in the blood, a person can reduce his risk of cancer (4). This finding was made after studying two groups of people one that donated blood twice a year and the other didn t. Researchers found the group that donated blood had lower levels of iron in their blood along with a reduced risk of cancer.

Researchers believe iron is responsible for free radical damage in the body, and there are already scientific reports and studies to connect free radical damage with cancer. So, by donating blood, you can reduce your risk of colon, throat, lung and liver cancers, amongst many others.

4. Burning Calories:

It takes about 600 to 650 calories to make one pint of blood (5). Hence, if you donate blood, you burn approximately 600 to 650 calories, according to WebMD and University of California, San Diego. If you donate blood regularly, you can lose quite a bit of weight. However, it is prudent to remember there is a waiting period of 56 days between blood donations. Hence, you will regain the weight, as your body will make more blood to compensate for what you have donated.

5. Maintains Healthy Iron Levels:

As a healthy adult, you should have around 5 g of iron in your bone marrow and red blood cells. When you donate one unit of blood, the iron levels in your body decrease by a quarter of a gram. This lost amount can easily be regained by eating a healthy, iron-rich diet. However, regular reduction of iron levels is considered good, as it prevents blood vessels from damage and prevents other abnormalities.

6. Have Longer Lifespan:

You could live longer if you donate blood for altruistic reasons. A study published in the American Psychological Association s online journal states that when people volunteer to do something for others without expecting anything in return, they tend to have reduced mortality risk compared to those who don t have the same noble intentions.

The number of donors compared to the demand for donor blood is low. Hence, there is always a need for blood. However, if you do want to donate, it should come from the urge to help others. When that happens, it will make you feel happy and satisfied, as a single unit of blood can save three lives. This happiness and satisfaction are the main reasons blood donors tend to live longer.

Free Health And Blood Checkup:

When people volunteer for blood donation, the doctor checks them thoroughly to ensure they are good candidates for blood donation. As a routine, donors are tested for hepatitis, syphilis, HIV and other diseases. Even your blood pressure, iron levels, temperature, and pulse are checked. So, you get a free health and blood check-up when you decide to become a donor. This check-up can help you diagnose certain diseases early.

Eligibility For Blood Donation:

Not everyone can become a blood donor. There is certain eligibility criteria you need to fulfill (6) .

  • You should be between the ages of 18 and 60 years.
  • You should never have been diagnosed and treated for cancer.
  • You should not have a clotting disorder, like hemophilia.
  • The minimum weight requirement is 45 kg or 110 lbs.
  • Your hemoglobin count should be 12.5 g.
  • Your diastolic blood pressure should be between 50 and 100 mm Hg and systolic between 100 and 180 mm Hg.
  • You shouldn t have taken aspirin in the last 72 hours.
  • You shouldn t suffer from any kind of chronic diseases.
  • You shouldn t have donated blood in the last 3 months.
  • You should not have been immunized in the last one month.
  • You should not have had any dental work done in the last 72 hours.
  • You shouldn t have had any alcohol 9 hours prior to the donation.
  • You shouldn t have received malaria treatment in the last 3 months.
  • You shouldn t be HIV positive.

If you fulfil these eligibility criteria, you can donate blood and enjoy the wonderful benefits of this noble deed.

Do tell us how this post has helped you. Let us know by commenting in the space below!


Tags : , , ,

5 Impressive Benefits of Blood Donation, Organic Facts, benefits of donating blood.#Benefits #of #donating

5 Impressive Benefits of Blood Donation

Health benefits of donating blood include good health and reduced risk of cancer and hemochromatosis. It helps in reducing the risk of damage to liver and pancreas. Donating blood may help in improving cardiovascular health and reducing obesity.

Table of Contents

Blood Donation

Every day blood transfusions take place that saves lives of many people all over the world. About 5 million Americans need a blood transfusion. Donating blood is good for the health of donors as well as those who need it. It is important that blood donation takes place in a hospital, a clinic or a blood bank, in the presence of medical experts. Donors should ensure that they are in good health to avoid any health issues post-transfusion to those who use it.

Donating blood can help in treating patients suffering from cancer, bleeding disorders, chronic anemia associated with cancer, sickle cell anemia, and other hereditary blood abnormalities. It is important to know that human blood cannot be manufactured, people are the only source of it and that is why it is important to donate blood and help those who need it. It is also possible to store your own blood for your future needs. Make sure the blood is stored at a good blood bank.

A mini health exam that includes a checklist for diseases related to blood pressure and infectious diseases should be conducted before initiating the collection of blood. Those who have medical conditions such as AIDS and hepatitis should not donate blood. People who have taken vaccinations or have undergone any surgery or have cancer, diabetes, cold, and flu should consult health experts before donating blood. Pregnant women should seek expert advice before donating blood.Benefits of donating blood

Health Benefits of Donating Blood

Blood donation not only makes the receiver s life good but also helps the donor to maintain good health. The benefits are mentioned below.

Prevents Hemochromatosis

Health benefits of blood donation include reduced risk of hemochromatosis. Hemochromatosis is a health condition that arises due to excess absorption of iron by the body. This may be inherited or may be caused due to alcoholism, anemia or other disorders. Regular blood donation may help in reducing iron overload. Make sure that the donor meets the standard blood donation eligibility criteria.

Anti-cancer Benefits

Blood donation helps in lowering the risk of cancer. By donating blood the iron stores in the body are maintained at healthy levels. A reduction in the iron level in the body is linked with low cancer risk.

Maintains Healthy Heart Liver

Blood donation is beneficial in reducing the risk of heart and liver ailments caused by the iron overload in the body. Intake of iron-rich diet may increase the iron levels in the body, and since only limited proportions can be absorbed, excess iron gets stored in heart, liver, and pancreas. This, in turn, increases the risk of cirrhosis, liver failure, damage to the pancreas, and heart abnormalities like irregular heart rhythms. Blood donation helps in maintaining the iron levels and reduces the risk of various health ailments.

Weight loss

Regular blood donation reduces the weight of the donors. This is helpful to those who are obese and are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases and other health disorders. However, blood donation should not be very frequent and you may consult your doctor before donating blood to avoid any health issues.

Stimulates Blood Cell Production

After donating blood, the body works to replenish the blood loss. This stimulates the production of new blood cells and in turn, helps in maintaining good health.Benefits of donating blood

Blood Donation Process

It is always good to plan blood donation in advance. Consult your doctor before donating blood if there are any health issues or concerns. It is always good to have healthy diet weeks before the donation. On the day of donation, make sure you are well hydrated, so keep drinking plenty of fluids. One should wear comfortable clothes during the donation process. In case you are undergoing any treatment or medication, it is advisable to inform the blood bank/clinic/hospital where you are donating blood.

How often can you Donate Blood?

One has to wait for 56 days or 8 weeks between whole blood donations. The waiting period is 112 days or 16 weeks between power red donations. Avoid donation if you re suffering from any disorders, and consult your doctor before doing it.

How much Blood do you Donate?

You can donate one unit or 350 ml of blood every 8 weeks. Organizations such as American Red Cross organize donation camps where one can participate and donate blood. You can also donate blood at any hospital.

How Old do you Have to be to Donate Blood?

Donor s age must be between 18-60 years and their weight should be more than 45 kgs to be able to donate blood. Any healthy person can donate blood after the required gap of 56 days. This wait time helps to replenish the blood levels in the donor s body

How to Donate Bone Marrow?

The first step towards bone marrow donation is sharing your details with bone marrow registers/websites. When a donation is needed, doctors would find the matching tissue type and contact you.

Individuals below the age of 18 and above 60 and with weight lower than 110 lbs cannot donate blood. A person with active infection, acute infection or diseases like HIV AIDS should not donate blood. It is advisable to consult a doctor and share medical history before going for blood donation.

Donate blood, stay healthy, and save lives!


Tags : , , ,

4 Unexpected Benefits of Donating Blood, benefits of donating blood.#Benefits #of #donating #blood


4 Unexpected Benefits of Donating Blood

While giving blood should be all about helping those in need, there ARE a few things in it for you. Here are four health perks to becoming a blood donor.

When’s the last time you stopped to appreciate all the good stuff your blood does for you? Without it, oxygen would never reach your cells and carbon dioxide would be filling your blood vessels as we speak.

Every two seconds, someone in the United States needs blood and more than 41,000 blood donations are needed every day, according to the American Red Cross. So while you may never worry about having enough blood to function, plenty of others aren’t as fortunate. With World Blood Donor Day approaching on Saturday, June 14, that gives you more reason than ever to get out and donate.

While giving blood should be all about helping those in need, there are a few things in it for you. Here are four health perks to becoming a blood donor:

Your blood may flow better

“If blood has a high viscosity, or resistance to flow, it will flow like molasses,” says Phillip DeChristopher, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Loyola University Health System blood bank. Repeated blood donations may help the blood flow in a way that’s less damaging to the lining of the blood vessels and could result in fewer arterial blockages. That may explain why the American Journal of Epidemiology found that blood donors are 88% less likely to suffer a heart attack.

It’s not clear if there are lasting health benefits associated with better blood flow. (These kinds of studies can’t prove cause and effect—for example, blood donors might lead healthier lifestyles than the general population.)

“What is clear is that blood donors seem to not be hospitalized so often and if they are, they have shorter lengths of stay,” Dr. DeChristopher says. “And they’re less likely to get heart attacks, strokes, and cancers.”

You’ll get a mini check-up

Before you give blood, you’ll first have to complete a quick physical that measures your temperature, pulse, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels. After your blood is collected, it’s sent off to a lab where it will undergo 13 different tests for infectious diseases, like HIV and West Nile virus. If anything comes back positive, you’ll be notified immediately.

“If year after year your tests come back negative, then you’ll know for sure there’s nothing you’ve been exposed to,” Dr. DeChristopher says. The physical and blood tests are no reason to skip your annual doctor visit, but they’re good for peace of mind. But you should never donate blood if you suspect you might actually be sick or have been exposed to HIV or another virus.

Your iron levels will stay balanced

Healthy adults usually have about 5 grams of iron in their bodies, mostly in red blood cells but also in bone marrow. When you donate a unit of blood, you lose about a quarter of a gram of iron, which gets replenished from the food you eat in the weeks after donation, Dr. DeChristopher says. This regulation of iron levels is a good thing, because having too much iron could be bad news for your blood vessels.

“The statistics appear to show that decreasing the amount of iron in otherwise healthy people over the long run is beneficial to their blood vessels, and diseases related to abnormalities in blood vessels, such as heart attack and stroke,” he says.

Still, data from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that nearly 10% of women in the U.S. suffer from anemia, a condition where your body lacks red blood cells or hemoglobin (most commonly due to an iron deficiency). In that case, it’s best not to give blood until the anemia is resolved, he says.

Women who haven’t hit menopause yet may find it hard to donate blood, too. “Pre-menopausal females can be somewhat iron depleted with blood counts just under the lower limit,” Dr. DeChristopher says. If you have low iron and you still want to be a donor, taking an oral iron supplement may help you re-qualify, he says.

You could live longer

Doing good for others is one way to live a longer life. A study in Health Psychology found that people who volunteered for altruistic reasons had a significantly reduced risk of mortality four years later than those who volunteered for themselves alone. While the health benefits of donating blood are nice, don’t forget who you’re really helping: A single donation can save the lives of up to three people, according to the Red Cross. “The need for blood is always there,” Dr. DeChristopher says. “It’s important to recognize how important willing donors are.”


Tags : , , ,

The Benefits of Giving to Charity #donate #clothes #to #charity


#donating money to charity

#

Sweet Charity: The Benefits of Giving Back

One of the best things you can do with your money is give some away. The payoffs of paying it forward.

We have become very strange in this country about giving away our money. We only seem to be able to do it unconsciously. Dropping the loose change into the charity jar at the convenience store. Telling someone to keep the change because the untoward jingling in your pocket may disrupt the afternoon staff meeting. As soon as we start thinking about making a donation, we start thinking of reasons not to do it. Money’s too tight at home. The person to whom we’ll give it will spend it unwisely. The buck in the envelope is just a drop in the bucket. Oh, Lord, the problem’s so big and my wallet is so small. The modern reflex seems to be that the worst thing we can do for a problem is to “throw money at it,” even though very few problems ever get solved for free.

In fact, as much as we inveigh against it biblically, or deplore the heedless pursuit of it, money is one of the few things that truly unites us. Our common currency is, well, common currency in almost all our essential interactions, including our most beneficent ones. Warren Buffett, eBay founding president Jeff Skoll, and the Google people seemed to realize this over the past couple of years. By giving away their money, they cement together some vital elements of our commonwealth. Smaller transactions have the same effect. Over this past holiday season, a management group in Rhode Island gave its employees money on the express condition that the employees then give it away to someone else in need. The company then asked their employees to share the stories of their charity at a company meeting. Thus does the act of giving away money form a kind of oral history, from giver to recipient and then to the people to whom the story is told. There is a spark of the collective consciousness in that, which heartens not only those people involved in the transaction but those who hear the story and pass it along. There is something like art there.

When giving away your money, it helps to think of it as more than bits of paper and scraps of metal. That’s not a $20 bill you’re slipping into the envelope there. It’s a bagful of flour. It’s soup or a blanket or a bottle of medicine. That handful of quarters is a handful of rice. You can even make this art out of raw self-interest. Giving away money can be the most selfish thing you do. With a father and four of his siblings dead from the same disease, I can look at the check I send to the Alzheimer’s Association and see something that is every bit as therapeutic as any new therapy that money may help create. I see new drug trials, and respite care, and a light against enveloping darkness.

There is nothing more visceral than cynicism, nothing more brutish than greed. These are reflexes, common and unremarkable, of the undeveloped spirit. But charity in its finest sense is always an act of the creative imagination.


Tags : , , , , ,

Health Benefits and Side Effects of Blood Donation #blood #donation #information


#donating blood side effects

#

Blood Donation

Health Benefits and Side Effects of Blood Donation

Blood donation does not have any major side effects, but there are several benefits. Blood donation improves heart health, reduces cancer risk and burns calories.

Improves Cardiovascular Health – Studies have shown that an increased level of iron in the blood raises the chance of heart disease. Regular blood donation helps males in particular to reduce the amount of iron in the blood which can reduce the chance of heart attack by 88%. Also, regular blood donation can lower the risk of severe cardiovascular events like stroke by 33%.


Stimulates the Production of New Red Blood Cells – The donor’s body immediately begins to replenish the lost red blood cells within 48 hours of blood donation. This process of replenishment can help the body stay healthy and work more efficiently.

Reduces the Risk of Cancer – According to study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, iron is believed to increase the free-radical damage in the body and has been linked to an increased risk of cancer and aging. According to the Miller-Keystone Blood Center, consistent blood donation is associated with a lower risk of cancers, (including liver, lung, colon, stomach and throat cancers).

Burns Calories – Blood donation helps burn about 650 calories for every pint i.e. 450 ml of blood given.


Free Blood Analysis – A blood donor receives a free prior health screening plus mini blood test. The HB level is tested, as well as blood pressure and body check is done. The donor is also screened for syphilis, HIV. hepatitis. and other diseases; and is immediately informed in strict confidentiality if any of these tests show positive results.

Side Effects of Blood Donation

There side effects of blood donation are potentially short-term, and depend on the type of product being donated, the body”s tolerance to the procedure, overall health of the donor. Common side effects may include-

These side-effects can be minimized by drinking plenty of water prior to donation, having a well-balanced meal before and after donating blood, and getting plenty of sleep on the night before blood donation.

Published on Mar 19, 2009
Last Updated on Aug 13, 2016

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.

According to a recent survey conducted by World Health Organisation, 52.42% of all blood donated in India is through voluntary blood donation camps. The figure was 45% in 2002. This shows that nearly 47.58% of all blood donated is either from paid donors or from family members.
Shazidamain Friday, June 14, 2013

i have donated my blood on 22 feb 2013. can i donate it again on 24 april 2013? i’m of 19 years
sriharsha.d Wednesday, April 24, 2013

kya jb koi physical ho to last night kya woh blood de sakta hai.
purnima.rajput Monday, April 22, 2013

Can I donate at a childrens’ hospital if i am taking balsalazide disodium fo colitis?
Michael48 Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Can I donate blood if a smoked weed.
Dominik Tuesday, December 11, 2012

your answer on interval between donations makes NO sense. It states that the normal interval is 56 days. But in men it is 3 months and in women 4 months. So normal for Martians? this destroys any credibility for your entire site.
TTB123 Tuesday, July 31, 2012

In Canada, Canadian Blood Services allows a person to donate blood every 56 days. The lifetime of a red bloodcell is 3-4 months, so maybe this is where you got this information from?
NSGSTDNT Sunday, November 25, 2012

i have hypertension 160/100mm hg can i donate blood.
umesh33 Friday, July 6, 2012

Really u have given good information about blood donation. atleast with this information someone change his mind and donate his blood. regularly.
venujustforu Monday, April 2, 2012

i have hypothryodism and i take thyrox 50 mg can i donate blood
sweta_25 Wednesday, December 21, 2011


Tags : , , , , , , ,

5 Surprising Health Benefits of Donating Blood #donating #clothes #to #charity


#advantages of blood donation

#

5 Surprising Health Benefits of Donating Blood

You ve read the posters, heard the announcements and seen the big trucks community blood drives are often in the public eye. We often hear about the importance of donating blood as it relates to the recipients. One blood donation could help up to three patients. Just a few minutes out of your day could save someone s life.

But we don t often hear about the benefits of donating blood as it relates to the actual donors. While the impact is a little less obvious, there are several health advantages that come as a result of giving blood.

Perhaps you are considering donating blood but are unsure of the effect it will have on your body. Or maybe you ve done it before and are curious about how it might impact you if you donate regularly. In any case, you may be surprised at some of the advantages. We consulted with some health professionals to identify some of the biggest benefits of donating blood.

Donating blood can

1. Uncover potential health problems

While it isn t the same thing as a trip to the doctor, donating blood can be another way to keep an eye on your cardiovascular health. You ll receive a mini-physical prior to the blood draw, in which someone will check your pulse, blood pressure, body temperature, hemoglobin and more. This can sometimes shed light on issues you didn t even know about.

If your blood is too low in iron, the clinic will tell you and won t draw your blood , says Jan Patenaude, dietician and certified LEAP therapist. They will also inform you of any other blood issues they notice or if anything seems unusual. An occasional check up on your blood quality could be the key to spotting a health issue before it becomes life-threatening.

2. Reduce harmful iron stores

One in every two hundred people in the U.S. is affected by a condition called hemochromatosis and most don t even know it, according to Patenaude. Hemochromatosis is a disease that causes an iron overload and is labeled as the most common genetic disease among Caucasians by the Mayo Clinic.

A committed blood donor herself, Patenaude recommends donation as a way to reduce the body s extra iron stores. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the removal of red blood cells is the preferred treatment for patients with excess iron in their blood.

3. Reduce your risk of suffering a heart attack

Donating blood at least once a year could reduce your risk of a heart attack by 88 percent, according to a study conducted by the American Journal of Epidemiology .* This relates to the iron issue again, says Dr. David Dragoo, health care expert at Money Crashers.

Dr. Dragoo explains that high levels of iron in the blood constrict your blood vessels and create more risk of a heart attack. Depleting those extra iron deposits by donating blood gives your vessels more room to operate.

4. Reduce your risk of developing cancer

If you needed more examples of the detrimental effects of high iron levels, here you go! Excess iron has also been associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Phlebotomy was found to be an iron reduction method that is associated with lower cancer risk and mortality, according to a study published by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The study focused on patients affected by peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which the Mayo Clinic describes as a common circulatory problem. Patients who regularly donated blood had a lower risk of developing cancer than those who did not.

5. Give you a sense of significance

While there are several physical benefits to donating blood, the most powerful health benefit is arguably in the psychological realm. Donating blood means that someone (or multiple people) somewhere will be getting the help they desperately need.

Patenaude believes the psychological health benefit you receive from knowing you re helping others is just as helpful as the physical health benefit. When you roll up your sleeve and sit down in that chair, you know you re making a difference and that makes you feel good!

Everybody wins

Now you know there are multiple benefits of donating blood for both parties involved. Donating blood is good for you and it s even better for all the people whose lives depend on blood donations.

If you are interested in helping even beyond donating, you might want to consider becoming a phlebotomist yourself. Learn about a fewreasons you might consider becoming a phlebotomist!

*The study referenced was conducted on nearly 3,000 middle-aged men living in Eastern Finland.

External links provided on Rasmussen.edu are for reference only. Rasmussen College does not guarantee, approve, control, or specifically endorse the information or products available on websites linked to, and is not endorsed by website owners, authors and/or organizations referenced.

Brianna is a freelance writer for Collegis Education who writes student focused articles on behalf of Rasmussen College. She earned her MFA in poetry in 2014 and looks for any opportunity to write, teach or talk about the power of effective communication.

Connect with Brianna Flavin

Please enable JavaScript to view the lt;a href=”http://disqus.com/?ref_noscript” gt;comments powered by Disqus. lt;/a gt;

Your Story Idea Has Been Submitted


Tags : , , , , , ,

The Health Benefits of Blood Donation #get #paid #to #donate #eggs


#advantages of blood donation

#

You don t need a special reason to give blood. You just need your own reason. Some of us give blood because we were asked by a friend, some know that a family member or a friend might need blood some day and some just believe it is the right thing we do. Whatever your reason, the need is constant and your contribution is important for a healthy and reliable blood supply. And you ll feel good knowing you ve helped change a life.

Donating blood may not only benefit the person who received the blood cells but may also improve the health of the donor.

What are the potential health benefits of donating blood?
While the most obvious health benefit of donating blood is the wonderful feeling derived from giving something vital to someone who needs it, the benefits of donating blood may extend far beyond this to having a positive impact on the donor s health.

Studies have shown that, in general, Americans tend to consume more iron on a daily basis than is necessary for good health. Ingestion of quantities of iron beyond a certain quantity can promote formation of free radicals in the body. Free radicals have justly earned their reputation for causing cellular changes which can disrupt normal cell function and increase the risk of certain chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. This is more likely to be a problem for men and post menopausal women since women of child bearing age shed excess iron through regular menstrual cycles. If a person happens to be a red meat eater, the risk for iron overload can be even higher.

Studies have also shown that men who donate blood on a regular basis have a lower risk of heart disease. With heart disease being the number one cause of death in males, this is, indeed, an important health benefit of donating blood.

How can you be sure you re not giving away too much iron?
Before you re allowed to donate blood, your hemoglobin level, a rough measure of your iron levels, will be checked. If it s deemed too low, you will not be allowed to donate that day. Your hemoglobin level will be monitored closely every time you present for donation and you ll only be allowed to donate every eight weeks to prevent too much iron from being removed from your body. It s a free and easy way to keep track of your iron levels.

When you consider the potential health benefits of giving blood along with the joy of giving to others in need, it s no wonder the donation of blood has become so popular. An hour spent relaxing in a chair every two months is all it takes to benefit both your health and the health of a lucky recipient. Someone out there someone is waiting for your generous gift of life.

To find a blood drive near you, visit www.redcrossblood.org and be sure to check out the events calendar to see dates and times of Blood Drives hosted by Medical West!

Sources: www.redcrossblood.org, www.livestrong.com


Tags : , , , , ,

4 Unexpected Benefits of Donating Blood – Health News #donate #hair #for #cancer


#advantages of blood donation

#

Photo: Getty Images

When s the last time you stopped to appreciate all the good stuff your blood does for you? Without it, oxygen would never reach your cells and carbon dioxide would be filling your blood vessels as we speak.

Every two seconds, someone in the United States needs blood and more than 41,000 blood donations are needed every day, according to the American Red Cross. So while you may never worry about having enough blood to function, plenty of others aren t as fortunate. With World Blood Donor Day approaching on Saturday, June 14, that gives you more reason than ever to get out and donate.

While giving blood should be all about helping those in need, there are a few things in it for you. Here are four health perks to becoming a blood donor:

Your blood may flow better

If blood has a high viscosity, or resistance to flow, it will flow like molasses, says Phillip DeChristopher, M.D. Ph.D. director of the Loyola University Health System blood bank. Repeated blood donations may help the blood flow in a way that s less damaging to the lining of the blood vessels and could result in fewer arterial blockages. That may explain why the American Journal of Epidemiology found that blood donors are 88% less likely to suffer a heart attack.

It s not clear if there are lasting health benefits associated with better blood flow. (These kinds of studies can t prove cause and effect—for example, blood donors might lead healthier lifestyles than the general population.)
What is clear is that blood donors seem to not be hospitalized so often and if they are, they have shorter lengths of stay, Dr. DeChristopher says. And they re less likely to get heart attacks, strokes, and cancers.

You ll get a mini check-up

Before you give blood, you ll first have to complete a quick physical that measures your temperature, pulse, blood pressure. and hemoglobin levels. After your blood is collected, it s sent off to a lab where it will undergo 13 different tests for infectious diseases, like HIV and West Nile virus. If anything comes back positive, you ll be notified immediately.

If year after year your tests come back negative, then you ll know for sure there s nothing you ve been exposed to, Dr. DeChristopher says. The physical and blood tests are no reason to skip your annual doctor visit, but they re good for peace of mind. But you should never donate blood if you suspect you might actually be sick or have been exposed to HIV or another virus.

Your iron levels will stay balanced

Healthy adults usually have about 5 grams of iron in their bodies, mostly in red blood cells but also in bone marrow. When you donate a unit of blood, you lose about a quarter of a gram of iron, which gets replenished from the food you eat in the weeks after donation, Dr. DeChristopher says. This regulation of iron levels is a good thing, because having too much iron could be bad news for your blood vessels.

The statistics appear to show that decreasing the amount of iron in otherwise healthy people over the long run is beneficial to their blood vessels, and diseases related to abnormalities in blood vessels, such as heart attack and stroke, he says.

Still, data from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that nearly 10% of women in the U.S. suffer from anemia. a condition where your body lacks red blood cells or hemoglobin (most commonly due to an iron deficiency ). In that case, it s best not to give blood until the anemia is resolved, he says.

Women who haven t hit menopause yet may find it hard to donate blood, too. Pre-menopausal females can be somewhat iron depleted with blood counts just under the lower limit, Dr. DeChristopher says. If you have low iron and you still want to be a donor, taking an oral iron supplement may help you re-qualify, he says.

You could live longer

Doing good for others is one way to live a longer life. A study in Health Psychology found that people who volunteered for altruistic reasons had a significantly reduced risk of mortality four years later than those who volunteered for themselves alone. While the health benefits of donating blood are nice, don t forget who you re really helping: A single donation can save the lives of up to three people, according to the Red Cross. The need for blood is always there, Dr. DeChristopher says. It s important to recognize how important willing donors are.

Post navigation


Tags : , , , , , , , ,